IMASS Speakers biography’s

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STEVE MORTIMER

MATT SKELHORN

CHRIS PATER

RICHARD LARN OBE

KEVIN CAMIDGE

CHRIS HOLWILL

TERESA TELUS

MARK BEATTIE-EDWARDS

RAY IVES

DR INNES MCCARTNEY

ALISON MAYOR

THE LATE NEVILLE OLDHAM (1935-2015)

REX COWAN

PAUL DART

BRETT PHANEUF

GRAHAME KNOTT

ROD MACDONALD

DAN PASCO

SARAH WARD

THE LATE – MARTIN DEAN

CHRIS HOLT

NEIL CUNNINGHAM BOBSON

RICK AYRON

EDDIE HUZZEY

PAOLA PALMA

MIKE ROLEY

IAN OXLEY

RICHARD LUNDGREN

ROBERT STENUIT

ALAN JONES

SELWYN WILLIAMS

DAVID MEARNS

MIKE WILLIAMS

DANTE BARTOLI

MARTIN READ

MIKE O’MEARA

ELENA PEREZ – ALVARO

ROBERT STONE

LEIGH BISHOP

JOHN DE BRY

DAVE PARHAM

STEVEN ELLIS

BRENDON ROWE

ANNABEL LAWRENCE

JIM TYSON

GREG STEM

JON PARLOUR

RICHARD WALKER

SELUK K.KOLAY

BRIAN CARGO

JOHN RILEY

MARK DUNKLEY

SEAN KINGSLEY

KIMBERLEY MONK

HENRY ALEXANDER

STEVEN SCHWANKERT

MICHAEL PITTS

Nikolaus Sandizell

SEAN FISHER

EMILY TURTON

ATILLO NASTI

MICHAEL FLECKER

PETER MCBRIDE

MARK ELLYATT

BEN DUNSTAN

DAVID J.B.SMITH

TED CROSBIE

BILL WARREN

SIMON SPOONER

MARC JASINSKI

JOHN ADAMS

DAVID MOORE

GARY MOMBER

Sir Tim Smit

ALEJANDRO MIRABAL JORGE

COLIN MARTIN

DOM ROBINSON

AYSE DEVRIM ATAUZ

RICHARD KEEN

SAVAS KARAKAS

FIONA PUNTER

PHIL SHORT

ANDY SEDDON

STEVE CLARKSON

MARTIN DAVIS

THE LATE ROBERT F. MARX (1936-2019)

CONNIE KELLER

SALLY CARTWRIGHT

JOANNA THOMSON

PAT CLYNE

LEO BALAI

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STEVE MORTIMER

Steve Mortimer’s happiest on Saturday mornings when he sets off with friends for a weekend’s diving on unknown shipwrecks off the South West coasts. A diver for 20 years, Steve has used mixed gases since 1995 and currently dives an Inspiration Vision rebreather when he can’t get away with his trusty open circuit equipment. diver.  

MATT SKELHORN

Matt Skelhorn is an archaeologist with Salvage and Marine Operations (SALMO) responsible for managing the environmental and safety concerns associated with the oil and ammunition remaining on Ministry of Defence owned wrecks. In this capacity Matt has been involved in work on the wrecks of HMS ROYAL OAK, the oil removal operation from the tanker RFA DARKDALE off St Helena as well as the survey of numerous wrecks in UK waters. Abstract – As wrecks decay over time the potential for them to release any oil or other hazardous materials they may contain increases. The presentation will focus on the challenges posed in managing these risks on the over 5000 wrecks for which the MOD is responsible around the globe.

CHRIS PATER

Chris , from Historic England, gave us a talk on the  the impact of the MMO & MCZ on our heritage (Marine Management Organisation  Marine conservation zones)

RICHARD LARN OBE

Richard Larn. OBE. IMASS President & News Letter Editor. Taught himself to dive in 1947 using German Drager U-Boat submarine escape apparatus, purchased from Exchange & Mart for 10 shillings (50p). Naval training school TS.Mercury when 14 years old: deck officer cadet with South American Saint Line; transferred to the Royal Navy, Korean War, navy diver from 1954, worked with ‘Buster’ Crabb and Lieut. George Wookey (holder of the then world deep diving record of 600ft). Left RN in 1972 as Chief Petty Officer Mechanician Diver. Works Director for Partech Electronics then Managing Director and founder of Prodive Ltd, the Commercial Diving School in Falmouth Docks, helping to put almost 1,000 HSE qualified divers into the oil and gas industry. BS- AC member and 1st Class diver from 1957 to date; BS-AC Deputy Diving Officer 1961-2. Founding member of CMAS with Joan du Platt Taylor, and past editor of NAS News Letter. Has been Licensee of the St. Anthony & Admiral Gardner wreck sites; current holder of Bartholomew Ledge site licence. Has been a team member working on the Mary Rose; Dartmouth; Coronation; Ramillies; Schiedam; Campen; Association; Firebrand; Eagle; Earl of Abergavenny, Halswell, and has dived thousands of other wrecks world wide. Founder, and for 21 years owner and joint Curator with his wife Bridget of the Charlestown Shipwreck Centre, Cornwall. Instigator and founder member along with the late Roy Davis and Bridget Larn of NAS(SW), now IMASS, in 1981. Has written or co-authored 60 books, many with his wife Bridget, including their monumental seven volume Lloyd’s Shipwreck Index of the British Isles, whose then 40,000 wreck entries assisted the RCHM, now English Heritage, to create the nations NMR(National Maritime Record) and later similarly that for Scotland & Wales. Chairman of Shipwrecks UK.Ltd. Lives on the Isles of Scilly, and in 2013 will publish two new books, “Augustus John Smith – Emperor & King of Scilly” and “Built on Scilly – a history of island shipbuilding in the 18-19th centuries”, and hopefully his first novel entitled “Captor”. Awarded the American ‘Knight of Mark Twain’ in 1969; was made a Cornish Bard (Gonyas an Mor) in 2006; and received an OBE in 2009 for services to Nautical Archaeology and Maritime History. Hobbies – guess what? Shipwrecks, writing and maritime history!

KEVIN CAMIDGE

Kevin Camidge started working in land archaeology when survey was still conducted in feet and inches, thirty years ago (can it really be that long?). He worked as a field officer for the Trust for Lincolnshire Archaeology until 1987 when Kevin retired to Cornwall. He took up diving that year and shortly afterwards became involved in marine archaeology in Cornwall. Kevin is currently nominated archaeologist for the protected wrecks Scheidam, St Anthony, Rill Cove, Royal Anne Galley and Colossus. Although it may be considered deeply un-cool to admit, Kevin is a keen recreational diver (including Tri-mix), enjoys dabbling with archaic photographic processes and is fascinated by Egyptology. Everything else is subject to change without notice. http://www.darkwright.co.uk

CHRIS HOLWILL

Personal: • Born 1942 – Bude, Cornwall • Lived in Plymouth most of my life. Professional Career: • Employer: National Health Service • Term of Employment: 53 years • Profession: Biomedical Scientist Main Leisure Activities: • Sub-Aqua Diving • British Sub-Aqua Club National Coach for the South-West 1977 – 1981 • BSAC First-class diver / Advanced Instructor

TERESA TELUS

Teresa Telus is one of the worlds leading female shipwreck divers who has accomplished equal to that of her male counterparts in deep diving. She has dived famous shipwrecks such as the Lusitania, Egypt and Britannic spending long bottom times at depth filming and setting up shots for her partner. Early adoption of rebreathers, over 10 years ago, enabled her to do the extensive exploration of the shipwrecks she had a passion for. Diving RMS Lusitania in 2000 on the AP Valves Inspiration rebreather and then going back to video survey the shipwreck the following year. As part of Carl Spencer’s HMHS Britannic expedition in 2003 to understand and prove why Britannic sank faster than her sister ship Titanic, Teresa pulled longer bottom times at depth, with the associated decompression penalties, than all her male counterparts; consolidating her reputation for doing the diving and not just talking a good dive and being one of the worlds top technical female divers Throughout her career she has worked with her partner Kevin Pickering to bring back top quality film of the all historic shipwrecks they dive, forming an archive for generations to come. By choreographing their dives and using various techniques developed over time, their footage has been used by several organisations.

MARK BEATTIE-EDWARDS

Mark began working for the Nautical Archaeology Society in September 2001 and since 2015 has worked as the Chief Executive Officer, responsible for the day to day management of the charity. As both a technical and commercial diver, Mark is the licensee of the HMS m Holland No. 5 submarine and the Norman’s Bay Wreck protected wrecks off Eastbourne. He has coordinated research and access to both these protected wrecks and in addition has undertaken research on the HMS m/A1 submarine and the Coronation protected wreck site on behalf of English Heritage. In 2014 Mark authored a report for English Heritage on the Local Economic Benefit of a Protected Wreck, establishing the value that could be placed on a historic wreck for the local economy of Plymouth. In 2017, Mark joined the team working on the protected wreck of The London, as the licensee’s (Steve Ellis) nominated archaeologist. Since July 2019 Mark has been working with the London Shipwreck Trust and Southend-on-Sea Borough Council to try to Save the London from the ravages of the Thames Estuary.

RAY IVES

Ray Ives Ray Ives started diving in 1966 and is still diving now, he began his career using standard dress who was a Royal Marine commercial diver and  then went on to become a saturation diver. Ray has worked for the famous salvage company Risdon Beasley, and as an oil and gas diver in the North Sea, Mexico, Africa, the Middle East, India and the Far East. Ray has an interest in the history of commercial diving and now runs a private diving and shipwreck museum in Plymouth on Yacht Haven Quay, ‘Ray’s Plaice’

DR INNES MCCARTNEY

Dr Innes McCartney is a nautical archaeologist who, over the last 25 years, has specialised in the discovery of, and investigation into, 20th century shipwrecks including the wrecks of the Battle of Jutland and many German and British submarines. A key element of his research is the interplay between the archaeology of naval vessels and the historic record, especially where differences between the two can reveal new avenues of research. He completed his PhD at Bournemouth University in 2013 and is now engaged in long-term research projects and academic teaching.

ALISON MAYOR

A late starter to diving with a 40th birthday try dive, Alison has more than made up for lost time in getting into a variety of diving interests. In recent years she has lead divers from Southsea Sub-Aqua Club to success in the investigation of WW2 D Day wrecks along the south coast. Alison is a BSAC Advanced diver and Chair for Southsea Sub-Aqua Club as well as a Fellow of the Nautical Archaeological society. She also enjoys studying history and researching, photography, marine life and somehow manages to fit it all in as well as a day job!

THE LATE NEVILLE OLDHAM (1935-2015)

Born in Cheshire in 1935 and spent his formative years on a farm. In 1953 joined the Grenadier Guards. He first started diving in 1956 whilst serving as Assault Pioneer Sergeant during the Suez Crisis when on attachment to 45 Commando attending a minefield and demolition course. On leaving the Guards went into the construction industry. To continue diving, joined East Lancashire BSAC and with their help founded the East Cheshire BSAC holding the posts of Chairman, Training Officer and Secretary. In 1979 the Club made him an Honorary Life Member. In 1983 attained his commercial divers’ ticket. 1982 was an eventful year for him. At the beginning of the year along with members of the East Cheshire Club, he was involved with locating parts of the Penlee Life boat. Also moved to Devon where he started a Dive boat Charter business at Hope Cove and joined the Nautical Archaeology Society SW, serving on the committee as Secretary and Chairman as well as a member of NAS national committee and also became a NAS part I instructor. In 1983 he formed the Bigbury bay investigation team looking for historical wrecks in the SW and in 1989 they were joined by members of Northampton and other Midlands BSAC and formed the South West Marine Archaeology Group with whom they have been fortunate to have located several of South Devon’s premier Historic wrecks sites. Erme Ingot site 1000 B.C (for which they won the BSAC Duke of Edinburgh’s Jubilee Prize,) Erme Estuary Cannon site 1632, the Salcombe Cannon site 1635 and Salcombe B Bronze Age site 3000 B.C. These are now all protected Historic wreck sites. He is also the Licensee of the Moor Sands Historic site 3000 B.C. Other projects that he is involved with are the investigation of HMS Venerable 1804, The Gossamer 1868, Chanteloupe 1772, San Pedro El Mayor 1588 and the Dartmouth Cannon site 1577. He has been involved in diving for 50 years and is still diving regularly. Founder member and chairman of the International Maritime & Shipwreck Society. (IMASS)

REX COWAN

A former lawyer, wreck hunter, writer and film producer whose varied work includes the award winning science film ‘Chaos’, has spent much of the last 40 years discovering and excavating shipwrecks of the 17th and 18th. Centuries.. Among his teams most substantial discoveries are the Hollandia, a Dutch East Indiaman sunk off the Isles of Scilly in 1743, the T’Vliegenthart sunk 1735 off Holland and the Svecia a Swedish East Indiaman sunk off the Orkneys in 1740. His finds have been seen in Museums and Exhibitions by millions all over the world from Japan to Malmo in Sweden. For many years a special gallery in the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam housed a substantial collection of his finds from all over the world. He was for 23 years representing independent shipwreck divers as a member of the HM Government’s Advisory Committee on Historic Wrecks. In 1991 The Queen of the Netherlands made him a Knight of the Order of Orange Nassau for his services to Dutch Maritime History.

PAUL DART

Paul started diving 1975, was involved with the Underwater Conservation Society (now Marine Conservation Society) from 1977 and completed a BSc in Marine & Freshwater Biology at London University 1980. An early interest in wrecks started with Hampstead BSAC diving in the English Channel and Paul took part in many UCS/MCS Expeditions around the U.K. Diving in Plymouth and S.W. England to broaden interest led to involvement with the South West section of the Nautical Archaeology Society (SWNAS) from 1980. • Wrote and published the �Diving Guide to Plymouth Sound� • Member of the SWNAS Committee from 1982 to date. • SWNAS Newsletter Editor from I992 to 1998. • NAS Tutor having run NAS Part 1, 2 and 3 Courses Archaeology project involvement includes:Ramillies, Looe Island, Coronation, Catharina Von Flensburg, Erme Estuary, Resurgam, Kravel, Vliegent Hart. • Founder member of Plymouth Maritime Archaeological Interest Group • Co-ordinator of SWNAS Shipwreck Conferences • Diving qualifications at Instructor level in BSAC, SAA, PADI, IANTD & TDIHSE Offshore Diver and IMCA Assistant Life Support Technician • Employed as Sport / Technical / Commercial / First Aid Diving Instructor at Fort Bovisand 1988-99 Paul is presently employed at the Diving Diseases Research Centre, Plymouth as a Training Officer for Diver Medic Technician, Hyperbaric Technician, Life Support Technician and Hyperbaric Treatments.

BRETT PHANEUF

Brett Phaneuf is the founder and chief executive of Submergence Group LLC (USA) / M Subs Ltd (UK) and through his office in the United Kingdom overseas the design and production of manned and unmanned, underwater vehicle systems. A serial entrepreneur, Mr. Phaneuf has recently turned his attention to machine learning and artificial intelligence; a new company (Marine Ai) has been spun out from M Subs Ltd with the goal of creating cognitive AI to enhance maritime capabilities by drawing on decades of experience in manned and unmanned marine vehicle design, manufacture and operations, coupled with vast experience in automation and autonomous systems software architecture, and computer vision expertise. Brett is also one of three founding board members of ProMare, a non-profit (501c3) public charity founded in 2001 to promote marine exploration throughout the world.

GRAHAME KNOTT

Welcome everyone to my world of discovery, exploration and adventure. When my diving career and life at sea started over thirty years ago I could not have imagined where it would take me. I have owned and operated dive charter vessels at home and abroad, discovered lost shipwrecks and helped push the frontiers of diving to the very limits. The sole reason I started diving was for the adventure and I soon realised the adventure didn’t have to stop back on dry land as I became more and more fascinated by our rich maritime history. I started The Shipwreck Project nine years ago and primarily it was aimed at divers, however times have changed. UK diving is in decline and while we still love to go diving and actively encourage divers to partake Deeper Dorset marks a new beginning with more opportunities to get involved for all and a sharper focus on Dorset waters and Dorset folk. Combined with my sea going activities a background in mechanical engineering stood me in good stead as I became involved in boat design and building alongside a rapidly growing interest in the development and operation of subsea systems. Working closely with a local sonar and electronics company I found myself in a unique position to build on my varied experiences and soon became a dedicated researcher and shipwreck hunter with a real can do outlook. Never daunted by those that say “it’s all been found” or the fact that some of my objectives might be rather bold I am a big believer in “if it was easy it would all have been done”. Conversely when I am successful the word luck is often uttered, no such thing as luck, luck is preparation waiting for an opportunity brought about by dedicated research and hard work. As you may have picked up by now I just get on with it purely because there is still lots to discover and many stories to tell. Off the Dorset coast a huge slice of our maritime history lies undiscovered and uncared for and is slowly being destroyed by fishing and dredging operations. I use the words maritime history rather than maritime heritage as heritage always sounds to me as if we have a right to it when in fact we don’t. If it is left to rot and disappear that is exactly what it will do and if we don’t put in the effort to if not save it then record it, we have no right to it at all.

ROD MACDONALD

Rod is a Scots lawyer with over 25 years diving under his belt. He lives and works in Stonehaven, a small historic fishing town nestling in a sheltered bay just to the south of Aberdeen, a coastline littered with wartime wrecks. He is married to Claire with two daughters, Nicola and Catriona Rod very early branched off into wreck diving. After visiting the scuttled German WWI High Seas Fleet wrecks at Scapa Flow and falling in love with Orkney, he wrote his first book, ‘Dive Scapa Flow’ which was published by Mainstream, Edinburgh in 1990 and is now in its 3rd edition. A few years his next book, ‘Dive Scotland’s Greatest Wrecks’ was published and is now in its 2nd edition. After a break from writing to raise a family Rod got back into print in 2003 with ‘Dive England’s Greatest Wrecks’ and his most recent, ‘Into the Abyss:Diving to adventure in the Liquid World’. Rod has been involved in the making of the Dive Scapa Flow, Truk Lagoon and Palau videos and has also featured in several TV programmes including Timewatch, The Death of the Battleship and Equinox, Lethal Seas, Maelstrom. He has written for most major dive magazines and newspapers on wreck diving. Scariest ever dive – the Corryvreckan Whirlpool, off Jura – the 3rd largest whirlpool in the world http://www.rod-macdonald.co.uk/

DAN PASCO

Daniel has been a marine archaeologist and commercial diver for 14 years specialising in the investigation of historic shipwrecks. In that time he has worked for some of the main organisations in UK maritime archaeology including the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology, the Mary Rose Trust and Wessex Archaeology. He is now director of Pascoe Archaeology Services and is a visiting research fellow at the University of Southampton. Daniel is the site archaeologist for the London (1665), the Northumberland (1703) and the Hazardous (1706). He is also Licensee of HMS Invincible (1758) and the Thorness Bay Wreck (unknown 19th century). Current work includes the evaluation and excavation of the second rate London in the Thames Estuary, the excavation of the warship Hazardous in Bracklesham Bay and the survey of HMS Invincible in the Eastern Solent. Daniel’s specialist interests include: • The design and construction of British naval vessels during the 17th and 18th centuries. • French influences on British naval ship construction. • Developments and changes in ordnance, gun equipment and furniture carried onboard ships. • The use of photogrammetry in the detailed recording of underwater sites. Presentation title – Excavating the London, a 17th century second rate Man of War Abstract for the presentation Following the out- break of the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the London, while on passage from Chatham, blew up in the Thames Estuary on the 7th March 1665 with the loss of 300 men and women. The ship now lies in two pieces 400 metres apart, known simply as Site 1 and 2. This presentation will focus on Site 2 and the recent excavation work funded by Historic England. It will discuss the reasons behind the excavation, the challenges of diving in the Thames and showcase some of the most interesting findings and recoveries from the wreck.  

SARAH WARD

Having completed both an MBA and MA in Maritime Archaeology, Sarah is responsible for ‘research and development’ for the Nautical Archaeology Society. Sarah’s objectives are two-fold: • – to increase the profile of the NAS, • – and the development of both the NAS training syllabus and archaeological projects that use and improve the skills of NAS Members, but that still have firm research outcomes. Sarah is licensee of the two Coronation protected wreck sites in the UK, has contributed to numerous TV archaeology programmes, and has research interests that include shipbuilding and social relations in South and East Asia, the use of GIS in maritime archaeology and the management and marketing of underwater cultural heritage. Prior to formally pursuing her interest in archaeology, Sarah spent 12 years in the finance sector, managing a multi-million dollar lending portfolio, the marketing function for a range of organisations including a global investment bank, and was engaged to set up the finance arm of a marketing and management consultancy. Sarah has been based in the UK since 2004. sarah@nauticalarchaeologysociety.org

THE LATE – MARTIN DEAN

Martin was a keen amateur diver who became fascinated by underwater archaeology in 1969 after attending a weekend course in Plymouth. He then gave up work as a photographer to volunteer on terrestrial archaeological sites in the south of England, eventually gaining enough experience to be paid. In 1973 he began studying at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London while working weekends and vacations for an archaeological unit in London. Once armed with academic qualifications, he supervised and directed sites in South London before moving to the National Maritime Museum at Greenwich in 1981 as their Underwater Archaeologist. He left there after five years to set up the Archaeological Diving Unit (ADU) at the University of St Andrews. He was one of the founding members of the Nautical Archaeology Society and for more than a decade was a regular member of the Executive Committee. In 1983 he devised the original multi-part NAS training syllabus, which was developed further by the NAS staff into the successful training programme that has taught thousands of divers throughout the world in basic archaeological techniques. Martin firmly believes that sport divers have a major role to play in underwater archaeology, particularly in the UK. Martin was the senior editor and a major contributor to the first 1992 edition of Archaeology Underwater: The NAS Guide to Principles and Practice, one of the key texts relating to the practicalities and ethics of archaeological work underwater. He also authored the archaeological component of the Health and Safety Executive’s 1997 Approved Code of Practice for Scientific and Archaeological Diving. In 2003 he set up Advanced Underwater Surveys (ADUS) within the University of St Andrew specialising in high-resolution multibeam sonar surveying of historic shipwrecks. Due to an increase in commercial work in 2008 ADUS became a limited company with the University of Dundee providing expertise in visualisation of the survey data. In 2013 the DeepOcean Group acquired 50% of the company and AdusDeepOcean Ltd is now the leading hi-tech surveyor and visualizer of wrecks for both the salvage industry and heritage organisations throughout the world.

CHRIS HOLT

Chris Holt is the Director of Full Circle Expeditions and one of the expedition leaders for the Scientific Exploration Society. After a career in the British Army that saw him serve as a bomb disposal officer, army diver and commando, Chris set off for pastures new. A commercial diving supervisor and recreational instructor, Chris now runs the diving logistics and safety for adventure and wildlife documentaries. He also leads diving and other expeditions. In 2006 Chris led the successful expedition to Patagonian Chile to locate the Wreck of HMS Wager, part of Anson’s fleet. http://www.ses-explore.org/

NEIL CUNNINGHAM BOBSON

Principal Marine Archaeologist for Odyssey Marine Exploration, has more experience viewing shipwreck sites through Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) cameras than any other archaeologist in the world. Mr. Dobson brings over 40 years of experience in the marine industry (Merchant Navy Deck Officer, Stability Officer on various oil rigs, offshore survival instructor/examiner, HSE part III commercial diver, IMCA ROV pilot) and impressive skills in planning and implementing deep-ocean archaeological investigations to his role at Odyssey. He is one of only very few archaeologists in the world who have successfully conducted archaeology in deep-water. Mr. Dobson has worked with Odyssey on scores of shipwreck sites and supervised archaeological work on many of the company’s high profile projects, including the SS Republic, “Black Swan”, HMS Victory, SS Gairsoppa and SS Central America projects. He has also been involved with other major projects in the Mediterranean and Atlantic. Ms. Dobson researches Odyssey’s archaeological finds around the globe and writes archaeological reports, papers and other publications based on the company’s captivating discoveries. His publications include a series of research papers featured in the company’s archaeological volumes Oceans Odyssey (2010, 2011, 2012 and 2014). Mr. Dobson has also presented lectures and presentations at various archaeological conferences and museums around the world and has featured in many TV documentaries about Odyssey’s projects. Mr. Dobson graduated from St. Andrews University with a Master’s in Marine Archaeology. He is also a frequent guest lecturer for marine and academic groups and organizations. In addition, he has written several papers on marine archaeology. http://www.shipwreck.net/

RICK AYRON

Rick Ayrton has been diving for over 25 years, he took up rebreather diving in 2002. At the same time he acquired a video camera to record underwater images and progressed to being involved as one of the cameramen on the “Deep Wreck Mysteries” series of historical underwater documentaries, in particular being involved in the filming of U1021, U480, HMS Patia & SS Armenian, Hospital Ships, Glenart Castle & Rewa and Australian submarine AE2 in the Sea of Marmara, Turkey. More recently he has developed a passion for still photography which he combines with his interest in wrecks and the history behind them, happily admitting that getting good images on deep UK wrecks is a process that he is still mastering. Rick is a current member of the British Society of Underwater Photographers.

EDDIE HUZZEY

Eddie Huzzey has spoken about his work on The Brighton Cannon project which date to the 1600’s, his teams’ discovery of the Josefine Willis 1807, and an unknown East Indian Company cannon site from 1807. Eddie will be speaking about the great work that sport and avocational divers have done in the UK on historic wrecks sites, from discovery, research,  to conservation and placing important finds into public museum spaces.   Eddie Huzzey had been diving since the 1970s and began his diving career diving mainly on wooden wrecks, his interest in maritime history helped to transform his diving pastime into a life’s passion of shipwreck investigation. With a great interest in the maritime heritage Eddie and his team have discovered over 10 unknown wreck sites around the Kent coast and helped to bring this information to the public, including donating rare finds like unknown ceramic types into national museum spaces.

PAOLA PALMA

Paola Palma is a Research Fellow in Bournemouth University working on the English Heritage funded Shipwreck Importance project and the environmental monitoring of the Swash Channel Protected Wreck Site. She graduated at Ca’ Foscari University in Venice and gained an MA in Maritime Archaeology at Southampton University. Her first degree thesis was research carried out on the investigation of the II Century Roman wreck in Genoa-Pegli, originally excavated by Professor Nino Lamboglia. This was followed by work throughout Italy, mainly on Roman Shipwrecks (for example the Marble Column Wreck in Tuscany, Iulia Felix in NE Italy). On moving to England she undertook her MA research on the place of the Cog within the maritime and cultural transmission of Medieval Europe, the cog in Italian medieval sources and the Jungfrusckar Cog in Sweden. On completing her MA Paola worked for the Nautical Archaeology Society and the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology before moving to the Mary Rose Trust to work initially on the Fiskerton Logboat (circa 500 BC) before she took on responsibility for the scientific aspects of the EU funded Monitoring of Shipwreck Sites (MoSS) Project where she worked on environmental threats to and in situ monitoring of shipwreck sites. Later she undertook environmental monitoring of the Mary Rose site were her work discovered important indicators of changes within British Coastal waters caused by global warming. Her work on the MoSS project was recently nominated for the Keith Muckelroy Award. She is a Member of the Institute if Field Archaeologists, one of the co-organisers of both the MAG conferences and co-author of their proceedings.

MIKE ROLEY

Mike Rowley, 68, a retired engineer from Dartmouth, was one of team of ten BSAC divers who took part in a commemorative dive on the wreck of HMS Pathfinder – the first ever ship to be sunk by a submarine-launched torpedo. The cruiser was steaming off the east coast of Scotland, near St Abbs Head, on September 5, 1914, when she was hit be the locomotive torpedo from German U-boat 21. Mr Rowley, a national diving instructor and head of BSAC’s national diving committee technical group, laid the wreath on the wreck, which lies 68m (223ft) below the surface, and also raised the Union flag above her.
“It was a really poignant and sombre occasion,” he said. “I was particularly moved by the occasion as my own grandfather was killed in the First World War.
“We had a simple service later on board the dive boat. with a very moving eulogy to those that lost their lives in the disaster.” Joining the dive were family members of some of the men who lost their lives, including grandfather-of-eight, Malcolm Stern, 85, of Rickmansworth, whose Uncle William was killed aged 22 and is thought to have been the first Jewish sailor to die in the Great War.

IAN OXLEY

After beginning his archaeological career as a digger in the late Seventies, Ian Oxley learnt to dive and joined the Mary Rose project as diving Finds Assistant. >Following the excavation and recovery of the Tudor warship he specialised in shipwreck environmental archaeology, progressing to become the Trusts Archaeological Scientist. He has held many voluntary offices in societies such as the Institute of Field Archaeologists and helped develop the Nautical Archaeology Society Training Programme. Moving to St Andrews in 1988 to spend ten years with the Archaeological Diving Unit he set up and directed the voluntary Maritime Fife project. After embarking on research into the management of historic shipwreck sites in Scotland at Heriot-Watt University, he joined Historic Scotland as an Assistant Inspector of Ancient Monuments before moving to English Heritage as Head of Maritime Archaeology. The National Heritage Act (NHA 2002) corrected an anomaly in the way archaeology was managed in England and gave responsibility to English Heritage for maritime archaeology to the 12nm Territorial Limit.Prior to the Act English Heritage published its initial policy on maritime archaeology Taking to the Water (Roberts & Trow 2002) which discussed the broad characteristics of the maritime archaeological resource in English territorial waters, the character of inventories of marine archaeological sites and the role and relationships of professional maritime archaeologists, amateur maritime archaeologists, recreational divers, and other sea users.The policy also outlined how English Heritage could fulfil its new obligations to better understand and manage the maritime archaeological resource. Understanding and managing the non-renewable resource maritime archaeological resource poses a wide variety of challenges and this presentation will describe the work that is underway in identifying and protecting significant sites, and in raising the awareness of other sea users and the wider community about Englands submerged historic environment and its potential. Reference Roberts, P. & S. Trow, 2002, Taking to the Water: English Heritages Initial Policy for the Management of Maritime Archaeology in England. English Heritage, London. Downloadable from http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/(click on Archaeology > Our Work > Maritime Archaeology > link to .pdf). http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/

RICHARD LUNDGREN

The success of the Ocean Discovery ongoing project “the search for the Admiral’s fleet” is nothing but sensational. Ocean Discovery has since the early 2000th discovered and explored more than 120 shipwrecks. Many of these wrecks have earned international fame and become research projects for scientists globally. Lundgren also works professionally with sea bottom surveys and environmental ocean studies specialized in advanced sonar systems and ROV, Remotely Operated Vehicles. Lundgren has participated in numerous underwater expeditions worldwide and is recognized as one of Europe’s most experienced trimix divers and underwater videographers. With thousands of dives to his credit – including cold-water dives, wreck, cave and technical dives using stage deco techniques, specially mixed gases and diver propulsion vehicles – Lundgren is an accomplished photographer and cinematographer with a contagious passion for discovery and exploration. Richard served as the deep cameraman on National Geographic, PBS and NOVA production – First Face of Amerika. Expertise: Exploration diver any environment Scientific Diver and Dive Leader Commercial Diver and Dive Leader Cinematographer with Red Epic and Sony F55 experience ROV operator with work class and survey experience Surveyor with MBES and SSS experience Commercial Captain and Engine certification class VIII Photogrammetry and site surveys including creation of photo mosaics and photogrammetry Awards: Discovery Award 2014 – For outstanding contribution or significant research that has resulted in a discovery that has advanced the field of technical diving. TEKDiveUSA DIVER of The Year 2011 Global Underwater Explorers Citizen of the Year 2012 Diver of the Conference 2012 Eurotek The Spirit of Independent Award Fort Lauderdale film festival Film award at the International film festival in Zagreb Surveyor with MBES and SSS experience Commercial Captain and Engine certification class VIII Photogrammetry and site surveys including creation of photo mosaics and photogrammetry

ROBERT STENUIT

Robert Pierre Andre Stenuit, a former cave diver and the test diver who made at sea the first ever experimental, deep water saturation dives (on heliox), has for many years been devoting his full time to maritime history and underwater archaeology. In 1970 he founded the ‘Groupe de Recherche Archeologique Sous-Marine Post Medievale’ (GRASP) which he has directed since, together with his daughter, the archaeologist Marie-Eve Stenuit. GRASP has devoted their activities to the search for, the survey and the excavation of the wrecks of these ships the traffic of which constituted the great inter-oceanic commercial currents that followed the 15th and 16th century geographical discoveries in Africa, the Americas and Asia. On the one hand the ships include the wrecks of Portuguese naus and carracks of the Carreira da India and of the galleons and naos of the Spanish Carrera de Indias which, for three centuries, did import in Europe not only the riches and goods of the West Indies, the Americas and Asia, but also the knowledge of their exotic cultures. And, on the other hand, the wrecks of the ships of the East India companies (English, Dutch, French, Danish, Swedish, of Ostende, of Trieste etc.) which simultaneously were re-exporting to Asia the larger part of the riches that had come from the West, together with Europe’s own produce, in exchange for which they would in turn bring back home the riches and produce of the Orient. Under the direction of Robert and Marie-Eve Stenuit, the members of GRASP have located, excavated and published the wrecks of 17 ancient merchant vessels. In addition a number of warships whose guns were keeping open the great commercial lanes of the four oceans. In its 35 years GRASP has discovered, surveyed, excavated and published the wrecks of the following ships: • Frigate Wendela, Danish Asiatic Company, 1737, Fetlar, Shetland • Flute Lastdrager, V.O.C., 1653, Yell, Shetland • Slot ter Hooge, V.O.C., 1724, Porto Santo, Madeira • Witte Leeuw, V.O.C., 1613, St Helena, South Atlantic • De Boot, V.O.C., 1738, South Devon, UK • Winterton, E.E.I.C., 1792, Salary, Madagascar • Saint Jean Baptiste, French East India Company, Banc de l’Etoile, Madagascar • Steamer Mei-Kong, 1877, Somalia • Nao Nuestra Se�ora de la Asumpcion Y Las Animas, 1681, Carrera de Indias, Panama • Galleass Girona, Invincible Armada, 1588, Northern Ireland • Frigate Ath�nienne, RN, 1806, Esquerquiz, Mediterranean • Cutter Sprightly, RN, 1777, Guernsey • Curacao, Admiraliteit Amsterdam, 1729, Unst, Shetland • Pink Evstaffi, Russian Imperial Navy, 1780, Griff Skerry, Shetland • Frigate Thetis, RN, 1830, Cabo Frio, Brazil • Nau Nossa Senhora Do Monte Do Carmo, Royal Portuguese Navy, 1775, Salary, Madagascar Robert and Marie-Eve Stenuit are Belgian and are based in Brussels.

ALAN JONES

Alan Jones is MD and majority shareholder of Shipwrecks UK Ltd, working closely with business partners Richard and Bridget Larn. He gained his `3rd class diver` qualification in 1967, with Bristol BSAC, and was with Southsea BSAC when other members included John Bevan and Alexander McKee. Alan developed the Shipwrecks UK GIS and has worked on technical and data developments for this resource from 2003, expanding on the Shipwreck Index which remains the foundation for this reference facility. Information about the resource, including expert reviews, is at www.shipwrecks.uk.com. His ‘Mapping Our Shipwreck Heritage’ presentation was delivered to the 2008 International Shipwreck Conference. aj@shipwrecks.uk.com http://www.shipwrecks.uk.com/

SELWYN WILLIAMS

Born in Chiswell, the Portland village behind Chesil Beach in Dorset, Selwyn Williams was always fascinated by that enigmatic beach and he joined Weymouth Underwater Club in February 1966 at the age of 15 and while learning to dive at Ferrybridge, immediately found and later identified his first wreck in 4 metres of water, that of a Whitehead’s torpedo chase boat called the Swift, built by S. E. Saunders Ltd of Cowes (later Saunders Roe who built flying boats). His salvage of its copper sheathing paid for his first diving cylinder. Although diving many of the inshore wrecks all around Weymouth & Portland, Chesil Beach remained the draw and Selwyn has devoted most of his over 40 years of diving in exploring, researching, locating and identifying wrecks of all kinds including planes, and of all dates from Roman to post WW2 off Chesil Beach. A founding member in 1973 of DUAG, the Dorset Underwater Archaeology Group, he is now Chairman of the Weymouth based LUNAR (Land and Underwater Nautical Archaeology Research) Society and a member of the Weymouth based The Shipwreck Project. In the early 1980s he identified and bought a late 19th century iron barque shipwreck from the Salvage Association and then bought five late 18th century troop and goods transport shipwrecks from the Ministry of Defence, just 6 of the over 350 known wrecks that have hit Chesil Beach. In September 1994 he obtained a licence from the Ministry of Defence to recover the wreckage of a Second World War P40 Curtiss Tomahawk Mk I aircraft he had found in 1980. He is also Author and Publisher of the book “Treasure of the Golden Grape” about the 1641 treasure ship “Golden Grape” wrecked on Chesil Beach. He has taken part in many TV and Radio programmes regarding local shipwrecks as well as displaying many artefacts in the 2001 Weymouth Wreck Amnesty Exhibition and 2002 Colonial Exhibition. Many of his artefacts have either been on display at Weymouth museum or at Underwater Explorers in Portland since then. When he first started diving Selwyn was called a pirate and was later promoted? to sea dog and has variously described himself as a wreck historian, or marine archaeologist but now proudly regards himself as a Treasure Diver, because the treasure is the story associated between each wreck and the volatile entity of Chesil Beach, (Thomas Hardy’s Dead Man’s Bay), a rich resource that yields its secrets grudgingly.

DAVID MEARNS

David Mearns is a Director of Blue Water Recoveries (BWR), a leading deep-sea technology firm specialising in the location and investigation of modern and historic shipwrecks. During his 15-year career based in America and Britain he has led the research and discovery of over 45 shipwrecks lost in water depths from 600 to 5,800 metres. His most celebrated finds include Lucona – a cargo ship sunk by a time bomb as part of an Austrian insurance fraud scheme, Derbyshire – a bulk carrier lost with all hands in 1980 that represents the single largest loss in British maritime history, and Esmeralda – an early 16th century Portuguese caravel in the fleet of Vasco da Gama located by BWR 494 years after it sank. http://www.bluewater.uk.com/

MIKE WILLIAMS

Mike Williams is a Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Wolverhampton. He has published extensively on the law relating to the foreshore and seabed and underwater cultural heritage. He advises government departments and agencies both in the UK and abroad and is retained as an advisor to the Crown Estate on foreshore and seabed matters. He recently acted as Project Manager for English Heritage’s review of the legal structure relating to marine archaeology. Mike has commercial and recreational diving qualifications and dives with the South West Maritime Archaeological Group. He sits on the Joint Nautical Archaeological Policy Committee, is a trustee of the Resurgam Trust and Honorary Secretary of the Nautical Archaeology Society. Mike Williams will discuss the legal disputes that followed the loss of the Schiller, both at the Board of Trade wreck inquiry and in the Court of Appeal over allegations of misuse of distress signals and disputed claims for salvage respectively.

DANTE BARTOLI

2008-present
ProMare Inc. Consultant for the US
Italy Research Program.
2002-2008
Institute of Nautical Archaeology Research Associate. Approved to conduct and direct research in Italy under the Institute’s name. Directed the
organization, funding and management of four consecutive years of archaeological fieldwork in three different cities in Magna Graecia:
Croton, Caulonia, and Locri Epizephiri. Every season of research was carried out with the written permission and scientific supervision of the Italian Fine Arts Bureau.
2004-2005
Instructor, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Texas A&M University. Taught two undergraduate level courses of Italian language and cultu re. Students Mean Evaluation: 4.94/5.00.
2002-2006
Graduate Research Assistant (Prof. Shelley Wachsmann); Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University.
2000-2001
Employee;
Società Ricerca S.p.A.,
Milan.
Italy. Responsible for data entry,
database cr
eation and management, customer satisfaction reports.
1999
2000
Carabinier
e Tutela Patrimonio Artistico
, Monza.
Italy.
Private
working for
Artistic Heritage Protection Special Unit
of the Italian Army

MARTIN READ

Martin Read was born in Surrey and brought up in Middlesex, Durham & Plymouth. Martin has a degree in Archaeological Conservation from the University of Wales. Worked as a conservator in various archaeology organisations in Britain such as English Heritage, the Mary Rose Trust and York Archaeological Trust and with the British Institute of Archaeology in Turkey. Returned to Plymouth in 1989 to take an HND in Computer Studies & an MSc in Intelligent Systems. Works full-time as a System Analyst/Programmer and Database designer and lectures part-time in Nautical Archaeology in the University of Plymouth. At present Martin is researching into Maritime Industries such as rope making and sites such as the Cattewater wreck, as well as supervising student projects including a hulk survey of the Tamar-Plym-Yealm system and the wreck of the SS James Eagan Layne.

MIKE O’MEARA

Mike O’Meara has a long and successful involvement in the subsea world. He started his career in the Royal Navy, and after training as a clearance diver was involved in a variety of naval diving operations before leaving the RN in 1975. He continued diving for a number of commercial diving companies before joining the newly formed Wharton William in 1978 as a diving superintendent. In this capacity Mike was responsible for the offshore management of diving support vessels and project teams and the implementation of subsea projects in the North Sea , Middle East and Asia . These projects involved a range of commercial diving techniques including air, gas, saturation and lockout submarines. After 23 years as an Offshore Manager in 1991 Mike was tasked with reviewing the Cullen report and the impending UK Safety Case Regulations following the Piper ‘A’ disaster. The outcome of this work was the formal introduction to the company of risk identification and assessment as a specific planning tool in support of safe operations. Through the years many changes in company ownership and structure have taken place. These have involved the following leading subsea engineering and construction companies:, Wharton Williams, Brown & Root, Rockwater, Subsea Offshore, Halliburton Subsea and DSND into the present day Subsea 7. Mike is Vice President responsible for Health, Safety Environmental and Quality Strategy for Subsea 7. In 1981 he was the Wharton Williams Diving Superintendent responsible for the successful salvage of 40 million pounds of gold bullion from the Second World War British cruiser HMS Edinburgh resting in 800 feet water depth in the Barents Sea. Mike. http://www.subsea7.com/

ELENA PEREZ – ALVARO

Elena Perez-Alvaro is a PhD candidate in Underwater Cultural Heritage at University of Birmingham, UK. She holds an undergraduate degree in History of Art and a MSc in Heritage and Museum Studies at University of Portsmouth, UK. In addition, she has studied a Masters Research Degree at University of Cambridge, UK, being the title of her dissertation “Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage in Spain”. She has been speaker at conferences such as Cantabria Campus Nobel in Cantabria (Spain) for brilliant researchers, Colloque Association Internationale du Droit de la Mer, La Coruna (Spain), International Congress Law of the Sea and Environmental Sustainability in the Mediterranean, Valencia (Spain), the Geography of Leisure and Tourism Research Colloquium, Surrey (UK) or I Congress of Underwater Archaeology, Cartagena (Spain). She is also the author of numerous scientific articles like Legal Threats to Underwater Cultural Heritage (Rosetta Journal) and chapters Shipwrecks as Watery Graves (Tirant Lo Blanch)

ROBERT STONE

Robert (Bob) Stone holds a Chair in Interactive Multimedia Systems within the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences at the University of Birmingham, where he is also Director of the Human Interface Technologies (HIT) Team. He graduated from University College London in 1979 with a BSc in Psychology, and in 1981 with an MSc in Ergonomics. Bob also currently holds the position of Visiting Professor in Simulation Psychology within the University of Plymouth. One of the first Europeans to experience the NASA VIEW Virtual Reality (VR) system in 1987, and having established the first industrial VR team at the UK’s National Advanced Robotics Centre, following an appearance on the BBC’s 9 o’Clock News in January, 1993, he brought together (initially) 12 companies to fund the world’s first industrial collaborative project addressing the commercial applications of VR. In May 1996, Bob was elected to become an Academician of the Russian International Higher Education Academy of Sciences in Moscow and was, in 2000, accredited by General Klimuk, Director of Russia’s Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre as responsible for “introducing VR into the cosmonaut space programme”. Bob and his team adopt a very pragmatic approach to research, particularly in the defence, healthcare and heritage sectors and they regularly spend time conducting studies in the field alongside subject matter experts. This approach has taken Bob from Royal Navy vessels conducting close-range weapons and missile trials to underwater operations onboard submarines and rescue submersibles; from oil and gas support platforms in the North Sea to remotely operated vehicle trials in the waters around Scotland; and from search-and-rescue helicopters over the mountains and coasts of Wales and Cornwall to operating theatres and medical units throughout the UK, US and South Africa. Bob and his Team have received numerous awards, including, uniquely, three from the Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors, and, in 2011, the MoD Chief Scientific Advisor’s Commendation for contributions to Defence Science & Technology. A born and bred Plymothian, he regularly brings his team to the region in order to undertake projects exploiting Virtual and Augmented Reality and new drone technologies in support of digital heritage projects.

LEIGH BISHOP

Leigh is a world-renowned shipwreck explorer and specialist deep-water photographer. He has been a member of many well know shipwreck expeditions. As a pioneer of deep wreck mixed gas wreck diving in and around Europe, his specialist deep-water photography, alongside his research has led to the documentation and discovery of hundreds of shipwrecks including several famous ones. He has been a member of some of the most significant deep shipwreck expeditions over the last two decades, that has utilized mixed gas and modern technology to explore deeper and previously unseen shipwrecks. Some of these include no less than six expeditions to HMHS Britannic the worlds largest sunken liner; RMS Lusitania, RMS Egypt, RMS Transylvania in the North Atlantic and the Nazi liner Wilhelm Gustloff in the Baltic just to mention a few. He has also explored an estimated 400 un-dived deep shipwrecks off the English coastline. He was a member of an Australian led team to photograph the deep Gold ship Niagara off New Zealand and is currently working with an ongoing project to photograph the deep wrecks of Truk Lagoon in the Pacific. He has also been a photographer on the expeditions to the Arctic in search of the lost British Submarine X5. He was the first to photograph & explore other famous lost British submarines such as HMS Vandal HMS Affray all again in deep water. He was also a member of the 2003 NOAA Titanic expedition aboard the Russian research vessel Keldysh. In 2014 he has joined expeditions to Sierra Leone, Africa as well as the Mars in the Baltic Sea sunk in 1564. Leigh is recognized as an innovator of black & White time exposure photography underwater, using a tripod he has used this method to capture many inspiring shipwreck images like the famous bow of the massive liner Justica and the huge guns of HMS Audacious. Leigh has been used as an expert in several television deep-water shipwreck documentaries and worked as a deep-water cameraman for National Geographic as well as the History Channel, BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and other global networks. He is a prolific speaker and lectures on the subject of shipwrecks globally and over the last two decades his photographs have been used in countless books and major worldwide newspapers. He has published hundreds of shipwreck articles that have appeared in just about every diving magazine around the world. He is the co-founder of the technical diving conference EUROTEK and the idea behind the concept. http://fourthelement.com/adventures/dive-team/photographers-videographers/leigh-bishop/

JOHN DE BRY

Dr. John de Bry is a world-known Historical archaeologist, historian and paleographer specializing in 16th through 18th century French, Spanish, and English manuscripts. He has conducted extensive research in European repositories. One of Dr. de Bry’s expertise and specialties is the underwater archaeology of Spanish, French, and English shipwrecks and the analysis, dating and identification of material culture. He has participated in a numerous excavation projects in the U.S. (including high profile projects such as the La Salle Shipwreck Project; see April 1997 Smithsonian Magazine, and the May 1997 issue of National Geographic Magazine), the Caribbean, South America, Madagascar, and the Philippines. He holds a MA in history and a doctorate in Post-Medieval History. He currently serves as the Director of the Center for Historical Archaeology in Melbourne Beach, Florida. Dr. de Bry is also a direct descendant of the Fleming engraver Theodore de Bry who published, with the help of his family, the Great Voyages, notably the 1591 Brevis narratio that depicted and narrated the second voyage to Florida by Rene de Goulaine de Laudonniere and the establishment of Ft. Caroline. A member of the Florida Archaeological Council, he works in close collaboration with various universities and museums as well as the State of Florida’s Bureau of Archaeological Research in Tallahassee.

DAVE PARHAM

Dave Parham is a Senior Lecture in Marine Archaeology at Bournemouth University. A graduate of the University of Wales, Bangor and Southampton University he learnt to dive at the age of 15 because of a consuming interest in shipwrecks and has worked throughout the UK, the Baltic, Eastern Mediterranean and the Indian Ocean. He has worked for the Alderney Elizabethan Shipwreck Project (about which he spoke at the International Shipwreck Conference in 1996) the Hampshire and Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology, the Nautical Archaeology Society, Southampton University and Wessex Archaeology. He is a former Council Member for the Institute of Field Archaeologists and former Chair of its Maritime Affairs Group. Dave designed and he is Program Leader for Bournemouth University’s BSc Marine Archaeology Program and Co-director of its Centre for Marine and Coastal Archaeology. He is the currently directing research on almost 30% of England’s Protected Wreck Sites and the archaeological advisor for both Neville Oldham and the South West Maritime Archaeological Group.

STEVEN ELLIS

Steven, a keen amateur archaeologist and passionate diver of his home waters of the Thames Estuary, has been the licensee of the London wreck, since 2010. The London, a Cromwellian built warship, exploded and sank in the Thames over 350 years ago. Steven was the lead diver for Historic England’s funded 2014-5 excavation/evaluation of the site. The wreckage remains on Historic England’s high-risk register, as it sits right on the edge of one of the world’s busiest shipping channels, every passing vessel having a detrimental effect on the wreckage. Steven and his small team of volunteer divers, continue to make exciting discoveries as the wreck erodes within the silt, but the race against time has always been to record as much information and rescue its artefacts before they are lost forever. With the support from Mark Beattie-Edwards, Steve’s nominated archaeologist, the Nautical Archaeologist Society and the London Shipwreck Trust, the aims are to achieve a long-term solution in saving possibly the most vulnerable and historic shipwreck in our waters.

BRENDON ROWE

Based in Cornwall, Brendon has worked as an electrical engineer since leaving school in 1989. After learning to dive in 1995 with BSAC branch Peninsula Sub Aqua Club he has held most positions on the committee and is currently Chairman. A very active instructor with the branch he also teaches specialist diving related courses for the Kernow Association of Sub Aqua Clubs. Brendon was instrumental in the founding of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Maritime Archaeology Society. A committee member of CISMAS, he acts as diving supervisor for the groups expeditions. He has been involved in a number of archaeological projects involving historical research, geophysical surveys and underwater searches and surveys, most recently on the debris field of HMS Colossus (1787-1798). Other interests include underwater video and digital photography. http://www.cismas.org.uk/

ANNABEL LAWRENCE

Annabel Lawrence has been employed as a marine archaeologist since 1995, after graduating from the University of St Andrews. She has worked on many projects, mostly in the UK but also in Australia. Annabel has worked along side Dr Colin Martin on the archaeological investigation of the Cromwellian shipwreck at Duart Point, has carried out coastal surveys for the Maritime Fife project, was the Scottish NAS training officer for 2 years and has been a member of the Archaeological Diving Unit for 5 years. Most recently she has been working alongside the SWMAG as their Nominated Archaeologist on the designated historic wreck Salcombe Cannon Site. Annabel is a director of the newly formed archaeological consultancy company ‘Connect Archaeology’, a company being developed by the University of St Andrews. The Pandora Largely due to the efforts of the Hollywood film industry and such notable actors as Errol Flynn, Mel Gibson, Charles Loughton and Anthony Hopkins, the story of the mutiny on the Bounty is well known to many of us. However, remarkably few people have heard of the voyage of HMS Pandora, which represents the sequel to the Bounty story and which in many ways is equally as dramatic and moving. The Pandora set sail from England in 1791 under the command of Captain Edward Edwards whose charge was to recapture the Bounty and arrest the mutineers, and bring them back to England to face trial. Captain Edwards failed to locate the Bounty but recaptured 14 of the mutineers that remained on Tahiti before being wrecked on the journey home attempting to make passage through the notorious Great Barrier Reef. The wreck of the Pandora is currently the subject of full scale archaeological investigation by maritime archaeologists working for the Queensland Museum.

JIM TYSON

Jim Tyson was born in Glasgow and started working life in the ship auxiliaries industry in the north-east as a professional mechanical engineer. Over the years, work has gradually moved him further south, but now Jim is settled in Market Harborough which is about as far from the sea as you can get in the UK. Jim’s diving career started in 1975 with Northampton BSAC Branch No.13 and he is still an active member!. Original idea was just to get some training to do holiday diving in Malta (did not like the idea of cold, murky British waters), but he came back fully enthused with wreck diving and history – never stopped, and now he only ever dive in the UK waters. Early days were spent on the classic steel wrecks around Cornwall and the Isle of Mull. Jim soon got involved in historical project diving; HMS Primrose (c.1809) wrecked on the Manacles, Cornwall, the VOC ship Campen (c.1627) wrecked on the Needles, Isle of Wight and HMS Halsewell (c1868) wrecked at Swanage, South Dorset as well as an Armada wreck searched for in the Firth of Clyde – but not found yet! Since 1991 Jim has been diving in South Devon and was one of the founder members of the ‘South West Archaeological Group’. The team has been fully committed to diving in South Devon with the following successes; • Erme Estuary Site – designated 1991 • Tin Ingot Site – designated in 1993, the team was awarded the ‘Duke of Edinburgh Gold Prize’ in November 1993. Oak timbers found on the site were carbon dated to 6300BP (over 4000 yrs old). • Salcombe Cannon Site – 1995 and still actively dived. Successes include designation in 1997, a press release at the British Museum in November 1997 and a further press release of Bronze Age finds in March 2005 Jim has always had a great passion for diving and discovering ‘history from the sea’ and feel that the British coastline has the most to offer any diver who seeks it.

GREG STEM

Gregory P. Stemm has served as Vice President, Research and Operations and as a member of the Board of Directors since December 1995. Prior to that, he served as an officer and director of Seahawk Deep Ocean Technology from the time he co-founded the company in 1989 until January, 1994. As a principal of Seahawk, Stemm was involved in directing research and technology for the company, which resulted in locating two Spanish Colonial shipwrecks in depths greater than 1,000 feet. He was also responsible for directing the archaeological team and operations that accomplished the world’s first remote archaeological excavation, in a depth of 1,500 feet southwest of the Florida Keys. Greg has written articles on the ethics and future of deep ocean shipwreck exploration and archaeological excavation, and has given over 100 lectures on the subject at the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, World President’s Organization, Young Entrepreneur’s Organization and before other groups. He was also named a panelist on Shipwreck Ethics at the 1998 Law of the Sea Institute. Greg is on the Advisory Board of Ocean News and Technology Magazine, and is currently President, and a founding Board Member, of the Professional Shipwreck Explorers Association (ProSEA). ProSEA is a non-profit trade association that provides a forum through which salvors, archaeologists and government entities work together to promote a high standard of ethics and principals in dealing with deep sea shipwreck resources. In addition, Stemm is a member of MENSA, The Society for Historical Archaeology, The Society for American Archaeology, and a founder of the Florida Aquarium. Since 1985, he has been an officer and director of the Young Entrepreneurs Organization (YEO) , an exclusive group of founders of companies throughout the world. The organization consists of over 1,000 members, with an average age of 29 and annual sales in excess of $10,000,000. Greg served as International President of the organization in 1993, and guided the organization to its first year in the black. He was also a founder of the Tampa Bay chapter, and Mexico City chapters of YEO, and was responsible for forming the organization’s first “Forum”, as well the first official World President’s Organization Mentor program. Last year, Stemm was appointed to the International Board of Directors of the World Entrepreneurs Organization, and is active in the activities of that group. Prior to his involvement with Seahawk, Stemm was co-founder and a partner in DeFrain-Stemm Advertising, a full service advertising agency which included clients such as Trammell Crow Real estate, NCNB National Bank, Hyatt Hotels and may other tourism and real-estate-oriented businesses. Greg was responsible for all strategic planning and marketing for clients of the http://www.shipwreck.net/

JON PARLOUR

Inspired by the exploits of Nelson, Hass and Cousteau, Jon started scuba diving while on a family holiday in Mediterranean in 1969. During these early dives he was fascinated by the frequent finds of wreckage, including amphora, and also visited many terrestrial archaeological sites. Jon subsequently qualified as a Ship’s Diving Officer in the Royal Navy (1973, HMS Vernon) and during his time at Dartmouth explored many of the wrecks of South Devon. While serving in the RN he also dived sites in Florida and the Caribbean. After leaving the RN, Jon worked on commercial inshore and inland diving projects before he joined the police service in Devon and Cornwall. Between 1977 and 1992 Jon worked as a diver and supervisor on the Police Underwater Search Unit. He continued his interest as a recreational diving instructor with the BSAC, SAA and PADI. Jon has been a member of the Nautical Archaeology Society since 1990 and has worked on a variety of sites in the UK and Northern Europe. He is a NAS Tutor and was previously the Training Officer of NAS South West. From August 2000 through until 2004, Jon completed a four year appointment as a member of the Advisory Committee on Historic Wreck Sites. At a local level Jon has been involved in work on the sites of Die Frau Metta Catherina Von Flensberg (1786), in Plymouth Sound, and HMS Coronation (1691), off Penlee Point. For the past 15 years Jon has been employed as Training Officer and Chamber Supervisor at DDRC Healthcare (formerly the Diving Diseases Research Centre) in Plymouth.

RICHARD WALKER

Rich is the Director of Technical Training for GUE, where he manages the development of the technical diver curriculum. Rich has been diving since 1991. He is a wreck diver and an exploratory cave diver, but spends most of his spare time diving the wrecks around the UK. He manages Project Tiger, an ongoing survey of LST 531 and 507, two ships sunk in 1944 while practicing for the D-day landings. Rich is fascinated by the wartime wrecks around the Norwegian coast and has organised several trips to Narvik to dive the destroyers and cargo ships sunk in the first sea battle of WW2. Closer to home he is involved with UK cave diving projects, dealing with the mud sumps in Britain, as well as pushing virgin caves abroad in France and http://www.wreckandcave.co.uk/

SELUK K.KOLAY

Selçuk Kolay was born in Istanbul in 1948 and graduated as Industrial Engineer from the University of West Berlin in 1974. After compulsory national service in the Turkish navy he joined the Koç Group, the biggest industrial conglomerate in Turkey, as Industrial Manager. In 1981 he was made a Director of the Koç Group and in 1991 he was made a board member of the Rahmi M. Koç Museum and Cultural Foundation. He has been the director of the museum since 1996.Selçuk has been a scuba diver since he was 16. In 1988 he joined the diving team from the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, which investigated vessels sunk in the Aegean during the 1770 Ottoman-Russian Cesme WarOn behalf of the Museum he salvaged the steam tug Liman 2 from the Golden Horn and restored her to working order.He is qualified in underwater exploration and the use of side-scan sonar, proton magnetometers and GPS.In 1993 he identified remains found in the Black Sea as being part of the German submarine UB46. In the same year he planned and conducted a successful search for the sunken WW1 cruiser Midilli and produced a documentary of the search.In 1994 he found and documented the remains of the WWII Turkish submarine Atilay in the Aegean, confirming the belief that she had struck a mine. A further expedition in 1994 located the buried wreck of the Russian Admiral’s ship Yvestafy from the Ottoman-Russian Cesme War of 1770. Mr Kolay started the project for the location of the WWI Australian submarine AE2 in the Sea of Marmara in January 1995 and located the wreck in June 1998. During the search in 1997 he restored the remains of a salvaged B-24 bomber and prepared an exhibition centred on it for the Rahmi M. Koç Museum.

BRIAN CARGO

Brian Clargo is based in Plymouth where he works as a Chartered Engineer. He began diving in January 1974 as a member of the Cave Diving Group of Great Britain but converted to open water diving, training with the BS-AC later that year as a member of Hereford Sub Aqua Club. He was a founder member of Doha Sub Aqua Club in 1976 and was Diving Officer of Sharjah Sub Aqua Club in 1980. Brian is currently Diving Officer of BS-AC Branch 1631 East Cornwall Divers based in Torpoint and has particular interests in wreck diving and photography. He has dived in 22 countries, diving on well over 100 different wrecks including those at Bikini Atoll, Truk Lagoon, Scapa Flow, the Red Sea as well as wrecks around the UK coast. He is trimix qualified and has an interest in deep wrecks which he shares with his wife Yolanda, whom he met through diving in 1977. He is a keen student of naval history 1914 – 1945.

JOHN RILEY

Born in Halifax last century. Started diving in 1966 with the RAF in Cyprus. Moved to Australia in 1972 and became interested in shipwrecks. Main interest is early marine steam engineering and iron and steel shipwreck formation processes. Has developed many technique to record sites to depths of 100 metres. Author of The Waterline Theory 1984. Led many expeditions to discover and record wrecks in Australia. Shipwreck Deterioration Consultant to all States in Australia and overseas. Team member on AE2 in Turkey with the role of positive identification, condition assessment and constructing a model of the site for the major sponsor. Recently retired from the Security Industry and is on a round world trip to check out the shipwreck scene. Thinks that Maritime Archaeology is not Rocket Science as many would try to make it. Still dive to depths over 60 metres and think the best shipwreck is always the last one I found.

MARK DUNKLEY

Mark Dunkley is a Maritime Archaeologist at English Heritage and has specific responsibility for the management of England’s Protected Wreck Sites. Mark studied archaeology at the University of Winchester and completed a part-time post-graduate programme at the University of Portsmouth. He learnt to dive in a Victorian Swimming Baths while working as an archaeologist for the Museum of London in the early 1990’s and undertook further diver training at Fort Bovisand in 1997 when he obtained his HSE Part III qualification. He was employed as an archaeologist at Wessex Archaeology until 2004 and has worked extensively throughout the UK. He has been a Tutor for the Nautical Archaeology Society and Hon. Secretary of the Institute of Field Archaeologists Maritime Affairs Group. Mark’s current role is varied and includes management administration and licensing in respect of England’s Protected Wreck Sites, providing designation and other scheduling recommendations as well as providing broader advice relating to the marine historic environment including the assessment of priorities for commissioning archaeological projects.

SEAN KINGSLEY

Sean Kingsley has worked as a marine archaeologist for 25 years with a specialist interest in Byzantine and colonial-periods wrecks, and global trade patterns. Off Israel he discovered the largest cluster of ancient wrecks in the eastern Mediterranean in King Solomon’s port of Dor. He is currently consulting with Odyssey Marine Exploration on HMS Victory (1744), English Channel, and assembling final reports on the Tortugas ship (1622) in the Straits of Florida, the world’s first deep-sea excavation. Sean is the Director of Wreck Watch Int., a London-based consultancy that throws a spotlight on the worldwide threats to shipwrecks. A central objective of Wreck Watch is to serve as a bridge between academic research, the private sector, industry and the general public for purposes of mainstream education and understanding. His work currently focuses on the effects of offshore fishing on underwater cultural heritage. Sean is the author of ten books, including Shipwreck Archaeology of the Holy Land (Duckworth, 2004) and Oceans Odyssey 1-4. sean@wreckwatch.org

KIMBERLEY MONK

Kimberly Monk is director of the Great Lakes Institute for Marine Research (GLIMR) dedicated to documenting and preserving Great Lakes marine heritage. She also serves as co-founder of the Maritime Archaeological Research Initiative (MARI), whose work focuses on shipwreck research in the Upper Florida Keys with the cooperation of the US National Parks Service and the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. She is currently a PhD student in the Department of Archaeology at the University of Bristol ; her dissertation entitled: �HMS Hampshire: Anatomy of a 17th Century Royal Navy Frigate.� She holds an MA in maritime history and nautical archaeology from the Program in Maritime Studies at East Carolina University, and a BA in anthropology from the University of Western Ontario. The Great Lakes contain over 6,000 shipwrecks, ranging in date from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries. The preservative qualities of these cold, freshwater lakes present an opportunity for archaeological research almost unparalleled anywhere else in the world. Only recently, however, have archaeologists endeavored to survey and inventory the extensive material culture submerged throughout this region. The physical environment of the Great Lakes placed a number of constraints on navigation and vessel design. Although most shipbuilders faced these challenges when constructing lake vessels, none were more aware than those who were in the business of building sailing canal ships, or sailing canallers. Their ingenuity and drive resulted in the sailing canallers that are the chief focus of this presentation. Welland sailing canallers dominated the seaways between 1846 and 1880. These vessels were built to conform to the dimensions of the second Welland Canal, connecting Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. Although this vessel type was not the only form employed for cargo carriage on the Great Lakes, the great numbers produced and the many locations at which they were manufactured underscore their centrality. It is not an exaggeration to claim that the sailing canaller was the single most important vessel type plying North America’s inland seas during the nineteenth century. Archaeology has provided a unique opportunity to study the features of three sailing canallers. Investigations of the Sligo, Bermuda, and China shipwrecks have offered a cross-section of features employed on these vessels. Archival sources provide some information on construction of canal ships but are not exhaustive in architectural schematics and design details. 

HENRY ALEXANDER

Henry Alexander is a retired College lecturer. He was born, educated and worked in London until taking early retirement in 1990. He took up diving and in the mid 1960s and was chairman of Croydon Underwater Club for approximately 16 years. Henry is a zoologist and a widely experienced diver. He spent a year and a half as a research scientist on the desert island of Aldabra in the Indian Ocean, doing the field work for his Ph.D. He moved from Surrey to South Devon on 1993. Running ecology field courses and training divers in Devon has occupied him over many years, and it was during one of these dives that he came across the Liverpool Barque Dryad. After 30 years of diving, research and writing, the book was finally published in November 2004. The life and Death of the Liverpool Barque DRYAD (1874-91) will be available at the conference, or from: Aunemouth Books, Aune Cross Lodge, Bantham, Kingsbridge, Devon, TQ7 3AD at 12.95, plus 2.55 postage and packing.

STEVEN SCHWANKERT

Steven Schwankert is an award-winning reporter and editor with 15 years of experience in Greater China, focusing on the technology, media and culture industries. He currently serves as Deputy Asia Editor for film and television industry publication The Hollywood Reporter. He resides in Beijing. Away from his writing desk, Steven is a member of The Explorers Club and founder of SinoScuba, Beijing’s first professional scuba diving operator. In 2007, he led the first-ever scientific expedition to dive Mongolia’s Lake Khovsgol and in 2011 will lead a similar expedition to Qinghai Lake, China’s largest lake. His book, The Real Poseidon Adventure: Britain’s Submarine Disaster in China, about the sinking and legacy of the Royal Navy submarine HMS Poseidon will be published in 2011 by Hong Kong University Press. Beijing & Shanghai, a guidebook he co-wrote for Hong Kong’s Odyssey Publications, is now in its third edition. Steven’s work has been published in world-renowned and regionally-recognized publications including The Asian Wall Street Journal, The South China Morning Post, Billboard, Variety and The Hollywood Reporter. It has also appeared on the Web sites of The New York Times, The Washington Post, PC World, CIO, and MacWorld.

MICHAEL PITTS

Michael Pitts is a renowned cinematographer and film producer. His work has appeared in numerous BBC, Discovery Channel and National Geographic television productions. Michael was principal cameraman on the underwater filming for ‘Mission Galapagos a three part, BBC1 series that was transmitted in April 2017. Michael has been awarded EMMY’s for cinematography on two landmark BBC productions, Sir David Attenborough’s, The Private Life of Plants and for his work on the first, Blue Planet series. He has also received the Kodak award for cinematographic excellence and the New York Festivals Gold award for cinematography for his filming on, Dragons of Komodo. He has recently completed a six-part series,Garden in the Sky. Filmed in Hong Kong and main-land China each 30-minute film looks at the challenges faced and gives a behind the scenes view of the work of Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden. Their key aims, conservation, the environment and sustainability are weaved throughout each episode. The series will be distributed throughout South East Asia and beyond. The films messages know no frontier – they affect us all. As Director of Photography for the film, A Plastic Ocean the five-year project took him across the globe. It gives a hard hitting look at the proliferation of plastic and the damage it causes to the environment and wildlife across the world’s oceans. Released in January 2017 and now on general release it is already having an impact on people’s perceptions on the health of our natural world. An ardent shipwreck enthusiast Michael is currently filming, the excavation and recovery of artefacts on the, ‘Invincible’ a 3rd Rate, 74-gun, warship wrecked in 1758 on the Horsetail Sands in the Eastern Solent Channel. Built by the French but captured by the English at the First Battle of Cape Finisterre this ship was to revolutionize warship design for Lord Nelsons Navy. His talk, Conflict in the Pacific illustrates the aftermath of the fiercest conflict ever fought in the Pacific theatre between the might of the US military and Japans Imperial, seemingly undefeatable forces. Coral encrusted shipwrecks lie forgotten on the seabed; aircraft and tanks lay enveloped in the jungles of the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. Chuuk Lagoon the graveyard of over fifty Japanese ships, and a seemingly impregnable Japanese stronghold features in this presentation.

Nikolaus Sandizell

Nikolas and Alejandro Mirabal gave us an insight into the shipwrecks of Indonesia Nikolaus is the eldest son of Carl Hochbrand Graf von und zu Sandizell (* 1924) and his wife Irene née Rohrer (1937-2011). Together with his two younger siblings, he grew up in New York City, Düsseldorf and Switzerland. In 1994, after a diving holiday in the Caribbean , he founded the public limited company “Arqueonautas Worldwide – Arqueologia Subaquática, SA” in Portugal . The company, which was run as a commercial excavation company for the first 10 years , consisting of a team of historians , naval archaeologists and restorers , works primarily in developing countries and recovers valuable cargo from historical shipwrecks from the seabed from a scientific, cultural-historical and economic point of view. Part of the charges were sent to museums , private collectors and auction houses until 2004sold; Since 2005, the repetitive cargo has no longer been commercialized and the rescue of underwater cultural assets has been funded through grants and privately.

SEAN FISHER

Sean Fisher was 7 years old when his grandfather, Mel Fisher, discovered the legendary shipwreck of the 17th-century Spanish treasure galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha in Key West waters. While others marveled at the Atocha’s priceless historic artifacts and treasures, later to be valued at $450 million, he focused on another “treasure” entirely: the lobsters his Aunt Taffi told him were living on the wrecksite. Today, Sean is vice president of Mel Fisher’s Treasures, the family’s shipwreck search and salvage enterprise overseen by his father Kim Fisher, headquartered alongside the popular Mel Fisher Maritime Museum at 200 Greene St. in Key West. Despite the passage of more than 25 years since the Atocha find, Sean still grins at the memory of his reaction when Taffi broke the momentous news.

EMILY TURTON

Emily Turton is a technical diver, dive boat skipper and lecturer in Maritime Studies based in Orkney – a group of islands off the top of Scotland. She can usually be found aboard her purpose built dive boat MV Huskyan. Emily has dedicated the last 15 years to the wrecks of Scapa Flow and continues to champion the WWI German Fleet Wrecks. She was the driving force behind the Scapa 100 Initiative, a project set up to commemorate the centenary of the scuttling of the WWI German High Seas Fleet in 2019. Emily organised the the HMS Hampshire 100 and HMS Vanguard 100 surveys in 2016 and 2017 respectively and the HMS Royal Oak 80 survey in 2019. In her survey and project work Emily collaborates with a wide group of people and institutions building expert teams of likeminded individuals. Digital heritage is at the forefront of their work which uses underwater photography, videography and 3D photogrammetry to document shipwrecks and bring them to the surface for the wider community to see.

ATILLO NASTI

Atilio Nasti graduated in Anthropology at the University of Buenos Aires in 1986 and has been a Doctor in Archaeology since 1991. For ten years he carried out a regional investigation of vertebrate taphonomy in the Puna of Atacama Region as a Scientific Researcher in the National Anthropological Institute with financial support from the National Council of Scientific and Technical Research. Atilio has also worked as a Forensic Research specialist for the Court and Police Department. Since 1999 he has been Scientific Director of the Maldonado Underwater Archaeological Project working with Oxford University MARE (Maritime Archaeological Research) and the Isla de Lobos Project in Punta del Este, Uruguay. PUBLICATIONS / REPORTS • 2001 – Spanish Troopship Salvador. www.nordic underwater archaeology.com • 2001 – . H.M.S Agamemnon. www.sub-arch.com • 2001 – Elementos de cuero rescatado del navo espaol Salvador. www.sub-arch.com • 2001 – Recovery and conservation of navigational instruments from the Spanish troopship Salvador which sank in 1812 in Maldonado Bay, Punta del Este, Uruguay. The International Journal of Nautical Archaeology 30.2:279-281 • 2002 Arqueologa Subacuatica en las Cercanas a la Isla de Lobos. www.sub-arch.com

MICHAEL FLECKER

Having graduated as a civil engineer in 1983, Michael Flecker, an Australian, sailed around South and Southeast Asia for a year before joining a Singapore based engineering company. That led to work in interesting places; Malaysia, New Guinea, South Africa , Myanmar, Vietnam, and during the Iran-Iraq war, to name a few In 1987 he changed tack by joining Pacific Sea Resources as diving supervisor for the two year excavation of the 1638 Manila Galleon, Nuestra Senora de la Concepcion, in Saipan. From then on maritime archaeology became the focus. His company, Maritime Explorations, has since directed the excavation of some of the most important shipwrecks in Asia, either directly or on behalf of others. They include the c.1690 Vung Tau Wreck, a lorcha with a cargo of Chinese porcelain, the c.1608 Binh Thuan Wreck, a Chinese junk with a cargo of Zhangzhou porcelain, the 15th century Bakau Wreck, one of the oldest Chinese junks ever found in Southeast Asia, the 13th century Java Sea Wreck, an Indonesian ship with a cargo of Chinese iron and ceramics, the 10th century Intan Wreck, another Indonesian ship with an extremely diverse cargo from a Srivijayan entrepot port, and the 9th century Belitung (Batu Hitam) Wreck, an Arab or Indian ship with a cargo of Chinese Changsha ceramics and an imperial gift, the oldest intact wreck ever found in Asia. Intan Wreck formed the basis of Flecker’s Ph.D. dissertation. His primary interest is the evolution and interaction of various Asian shipbuilding traditions. http://www.maritime-explorations.com/

PETER MCBRIDE

Peter commenced leisure diving in the Mediterranean whilst on a Submarine Depot ship based in Malta in 1958. Qualified as a RN Ship’s Diving Officer in the UK in 1969, as a BSAC Sports diver and HSC4 1981. Involved in naval expeditions which carried out archaeological work on the Association and Eagle (Tearing Ledge) (1707) on the Scilly Islands in the late 60’s early 70’s. Discovered and excavated the Mullion Pin Wreck (Santo Christo de Costello)(1667) with Richard Larn and Roy Davis (1969-73). During the 70’s was also involved in archaeological work on naval wrecks; Mary Yacht (1675), Schiedam (1684), Dartmouth (1690), the East Indiamen; De Liefde (1711) and Svecia (1743), also the Portuguese ship St. Anthony (1526).=20 In the 80’s worked on the Campen (1627), a Dutch East Indiaman on the Needles, Isle of Wight, and the 2nd Rate Ramillies on Bolt Tail, Devon. (report pending) In the 70’s searched for, and in 1978, discovered the off shore of 2nd Rate, HMS Coronation (1691) off Rame Head. Held the licence to survey and excavate the site until 1986 and is still involved in ongoing work on this wreck, her scattered guns now extending over half a mile of the sea bed. Has three sons, all divers from an early age. The eldest, David, is a commercial diver and professional underwater photographer who lives in the Scilly’s. All have assisted in many archaeological projects over the years.

MARK ELLYATT

Mark Ellyatt held the record for the world’s deepest dive reaching 313m in 2003 35 miles off the coast of Phuket, Thailand after a dive lasting 7 hours, beating John Bennett’s previous 308m record. – Ellyatt’s dive computer reading from the dive was made available. In 2003, during a previous extreme deep diving attempt Ellyatt suffered extreme isobaric counterdiffusion (ICD) during decompression, and only survived the dive by virtue of being helped by his support divers.ICD is a common malady in extreme deep diving, and nearly claimed the life of John Bennett in his world record setting deep dive. Don Shirley also suffered extremely serious ICD during the dive which killed Dave Shaw. HMS Victoria Ellyatt assisted the local diver Christian Francis in discovering the wreck of the battleship HMS Victoria in 2004, 150m underwater off Tripoli, Lebanon. The wreck sits vertically on its bow, partly buried in the seabed – described as being its ‘own underwater tombstone’.

BEN DUNSTAN

Ben talked about a mysterious copper wreck off the Manacles, in Cornwall

DAVID J.B.SMITH

David J.B. Smith is a military author and Naval researcher with a specific interest in the Royal Navy of World War Two. A month after his first non-fiction book ‘Being Silent They Speak: The Story of a Submarine’ was published it marched straight to No1 in the Amazon.co.uk World War Two genre as a Kindle eBook. Joining the Senior Service as a RADAR operator at the age of 17 years, David went on to enjoy a full and varied 23-year Royal Navy career. David retired from service life in 2009 as a Chief Petty Officer (Seaman), and now lives and writes non-fiction military books in a quiet quayside village in Devon, England. Bibliography Smith, David (2012). Being Silent They Speak: The Story of a WWII Submarine Unbeaten. Plymouth: Stand Easy. ISBN 978-0-9573925-1-9 Smith, David (2015) Surcouf Revisited. Plymouth: Stand Easy ISBN 978-0-9573925-3-3

TED CROSBIE

Ted Crosbie Ted was to be a Military Medic with the RAMC, and for his ‘day job’ specialises in diving physiology and the immediate care of injured divers. He completed his graduate studies in Diving Medical Technology and Life Sciences, where he developed a keen interest in underwater archaeology and continues to develop these skills with Sussex University, where he is an associate tutor on the Maritime Archaeology course. He has developed various protocols for underwater archaeology projects and co-founded the ADA in 2007, developing additional skills in accordance with the current ESDC syllabus; the aim was to provide a holistic approach to underwater archaeology for recreational and technical divers, that used current UK best practice as opposed to protocols adopted by other agencies from the United States. Ted prefers the use of technical skills in the application of diving technologies for underwater projects and is a firm believer in the use of divers and human interaction within the historic environment, and using data collected for accurate GIS and mapping across a broad spectrum of archaeological periods, allowing data to presented in 4-D. Ted now specialises in diving project management and supervision for a wide range of projects. In 2008 he was asked to develop the Highball Bouncing Bomb Project with Dr. Iain Murray from the University of Dundee.

BILL WARREN

Bill was born in Pasadena, California.  He sang his first solo  at age 12.  By the time he was 18 he had won two National singing contests.  He was offered full scholarships from UCLA and Azusa Pacific University.  He chose the latter one. He continued to study music and sang off and on around the country  as a concert singer/entertainer as well as nightclubs, casinos, cruise ships.  Bill took acting lessons with Arnold Schwartzenegger.  Their coach was Eric Morris. He had non speaking parts in ’Toons’ with Kim Bassinger and in ‘Endangered Species’ with Robt. Urich. In 1975 while singing in Anchorage Alaska he found a book at a library about sunken ships and what treasures they held.  Returning to California he started his own commercial diving company where he and his divers harvested sea urchins and sold them to Japan. It was in this year that he found his first shipwreck off Santa Cruz Island near Santa Barbara. In 1976 Bill acquired the fist-of-its-kind shipwreck salvage license issued by the city of Oceanside in California.  He and his divers found the remains of the first Spanish ship to enter California waters.  It was the “Trinidad” circa 1540.  Prior to Bill finding that wreck, Bill Burrid, producer of the TV show “I Search for Adventure,” produced a segment about the Trinidad.  That same year Bill filed in U.S. Federal Court a claim for California’s best shipwrecks.  It was met with stiff competition by the State of California. There were several newspaper articles about Bill and his shipwreck treasure projects. Bill hired a Polish film crew and produced a documentary of the Trinidad and his work searching for it. In 1976 Bill recorded his first album. The diving was not full time and Bill continued to sing. He recorded his first album “He Paid A Debt” in Dallas Texas on the “Rainbow” label.  In 1980 Bill recorded his second album that was recorded in Los Angeles and as a result of creating a great album, produced by Vikki Carr’s arranger, Dave Williamson.. The album cost $65,000  . The title was “We Win.” It was one of the most played albums on Contemporary Christian Radio. While Bill was performing in Palm Springs at the Biltmore and other night clubs and restaurants, Bill met Frank Sinatra and after Sinatra heard Bill sing, he asked him to sing at his Wedding Anniversary at a nightclub named Patti Z’s.   In 1980 Bill started his own TV show in the desert named “Palm Springs Gold.” Both Jilly Rizzo and Sinatra were his guests. In that year and for years later, Bill sang at MGM Grand Casino in Reno and Las Vegas, Nevada USA, Tropicana hotel, Sands hotel/casino Las Vegas as well as the Coconut Grove in Los Angeles, Hollywood Palladium and many other prestigious places. In 1980 Bill recorded his second album at United Western Studios in Hollywood. It became one of the top ten most played radio station contemporary Gospel albums in America In 1980 Bill sang with Kathy Lee Gifford on the Variety show TV telethon as well as with her at the “Angel Awards” at the Hollywood Palladium.  Della Reese was the Hostess. In 1981 Bill began to sing under the stage name of Michael Valentino on the Royal Viking Cruise Lines out of Norway and was voted the #1 entertainer that year. In 1985 Bill recorded his first single called “Let’s Love the Night Away” and it was played on some Los Angeles radio stations. 1985  Bill performed for various conventions in Palm Springs including the Buick Dealers of America. In 1989 Bill created a company named ‘Golden Quest Inc’ and took the company public.  He and his company secured a treasure salvage license in the Bahamas at Great Abaco and there he and his divers found  ancient shipwrecks. In 1993 Bill wrote his first book titled ‘The Shipwrecks of Great Abaco.’ The book detailed the many wrecks and their history. Some treasure was found. In 1994 Bill researched what he was told was one of the ten richest ships to sink, the ‘Verelst.’   The ship was an English East Indiaman that sank off the African country of Mauritius.  The shipwreck author, Sir Robert Marx, wrote an article for a magazine and claimed the ship carried 740 lbs of uncut diamonds as well as a huge diamond said to be the size of a mans fist.  I called Marx and asked him if he thought anyone found the wreck or even knew about it. He said no. I began my research and ended up in London at the India Office and Library. I was told the ships log book most likely was not there because there had been a big fire in the late 1800’s.  I asked them to please look just in case.  One hour later I was informed they found the book.  No cameras are allowed in the library but the director made me a gift by allowing me to video tape the huge book which I did. I have that video. It shows the names of the passengers and crew and details the sinking of the ship. It was considered the richest ship from England to sink that season. There is much more to this story. In 1997 Bill found a deserted island situated 100 miles south of Cuba and nearly half way between Haiti and Jamaica. The Coast Guard notified him that they were abandoning the island and its lighthouse which is the highest lighthouse America has ever built. The island is called Navassa and measures about 2 miles long and 1 mile wide. It is a guano island.  Bill found an old law still on the books called “The Guano Act of 1856” which allows any American to file a guano fertilizer mining claim on any deserted island that is not under the lawful jurisdiction of any other government. Bill hired an International lawyer and filed the required document with the Secretary of State. Then, as newspapers picked up the story, a man named Jerry Patnode from Baltimore, Md. Patnode was professor of economics at John Hopkins U. Patnode contacted Bill to say that his great grandfather, James Woodward, was the governor of the island in 1900 and was an owner. Patnode sold the island to Bill. Gave him a deed.  When America heard about this the Secretary of the Interior, Bruce Babbitt, set about to stop Bill. Bill sued America and the named defendants were; Bill Clinton, Bruce Babbitt, Madeline Albright and Warren Christopher.  The case is still in court and ‘set aside without prejudice.’ Congressman Don Young and other congressmen encouraged him with his claim to Navassa and told him they would hold open hearings and bring in Government officials who were attempting to block Bill with his claim. They promised to amend the Guano Act to make it stronger for men like Bill who wished to make money in the guano fertilizer business. In 1998 Bill ran for U.S. Congress in District 52  in San Diego, Calif. against fellow neighbor Duncan Hunter. Bill lost. In 2002 Bill ran for U.S. Congress in District 8 in Union City, Tennessee. He lost his parties race by only 3,200 votes.

SIMON SPOONER

Dr. Spooner is founder and President of the Anglo~Danish Maritime Archaeological Team (ADMAT), a non-profit organization working on the preservation of historic shipwrecks in the Caribbean. He has directed numerous excavations and surveys including, the White House Bay Wreck (1780s), La Viette (1802), Faience Wreck (1760), Le Casimir (1829), Carron Wreck (1802) Tile Wreck (1690) Musket Ball Wreck (1790) and the survey for Santiago (1582) and the lost 1563 Spanish Fleet Dr. Spooner is founder and President of the Anglo~Danish Maritime Archaeological Team (ADMAT), a non-profit organization working on the preservation of historic shipwrecks in the Caribbean. He has directed numerous excavations and surveys including, the >White House Bay Wreck (1780s), La Viette Wreck (1760), Le Casimir (1829), Carron Wreck (1802) Tile Wreck (1690) Musket Ball Wreck (1790) and the survey for Santiago (1582) and the lost 1563 Spanish Fleet. Dr. Spooner’s doctorial thesis was entitled ‘Maritime Taphonomy’ – A study of historic shipwreck formation process on the north coast of the Dominican Republic from 1563 to 1829′. He holds a BSc and is a Member of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, as well as being appointed to Institute of Field Archaeologists at the highest Member level. Dr. Spooner is a member of the Council for British Archaeology as well as the Nautical Archaeological Society. Dr. Spooner is a well known lecturer in Maritime Archaeology. He has taught PhD Students from NOVA Southeastern University in the field, whilst in the Dominican Republic. He currently is a visiting lecturer to MA maritime archaeological students at the University of Bristol. He has spoken at numerous conferences on the issue of the Protection of Underwater Cultural Heritage, from as far a field as New Orleans to Cartagena. During his holidays he lectures on Maritime Archaeology on the Seabourn Pride, Seabourn Legend and Seabourn Spirit as well as the QE2 and QM2 cruise ships. For the last two decades he has been teaching divers and students. In 1991 he was appointed Advanced Instructor with the British Sub Aqua Club, as well as being a senior instructor with PADI and holding a 3 Star CMAS instructor ticket. Having dived all over the world he has now made over 8,500 dives, with thousands of hours spent underwater conducting archaeology. Dr. Spooner also is one of a very few archaeologists in the world who have a pilots license for the Oceaneering Hydra Magnum Commercial ROV. He is a protector of maritime archaeological sites in the Caribbean, fighting against looting, treasure hunters as well as advising governments on how to protect their underwater cultural heritage. http://www.admat.org.uk/

MARC JASINSKI

Studies • Licence en Sciences chimiques (MS degree in chemistry) – Universite Libre de Bruxelles – Belgium • Professional photography – Famous Photographers School – Newport – USA • Business administration – CEPAC – Solvay Business School – Université Libre de Bruxelles – Belgium Occupations • 1959 to 1963 – Cave diving in Han-sur-Lesse (Belgium), France, Switzerland. Discovery of an important cave system in Han-sur-Lesse, also of a major protohistoric archaeological deposit • Assistant to the professor of analytical chemistry – Solvay Business School and Ecole Polytechnique – Université Libre de Bruxelles – Belgium • 1963 to 1964 – Head R & D – AQUASTAR (watches and underwater safety instruments for divers) – Geneva – Switzerland • 1964 to 1999 – Freelance photographer (industrial and commercial photography, still and movie underwater photography) • Developed very wide angle lenses for underwater photography in low visibility – Seven Seas Optics – Brussels – (Jasinski 1971 a) • 1976 to 1979 – Head of Professional and Military Diving Equipment Sales – Diving Surfing Marine Co. and D’Ieteren Sport S.A. – Brussels Some highlights Since 1993 • Created and organised underwater archaeology in Southern Belgium – (Jasinski 1971 b) 1967-1982 • Involved in many underwater excavations at sea (Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, Indian Ocean, Carribean Sea, Timor Sea ..) • A. o., wrecks of trading ships Lastdrager, Wendela, Slot ter Hooge, Winterton, Nossa Senhora do Monte do Carmo, warships Girona and Ça Ira • Assistant to archaeologist and naval historian Robert Sténuit during excavations in Madagascar, Haïti, Indonesia… • In charge of logistics, photography and finds preservation Since 1985 – Developed precise methods for underwater mapping and surveying in extremely low visibility surroundings (Jasinski 1986, 1988, 1994) Since 1987 – Founder and honorary chairman of the Centre de Recherches Archéologiques Fluviales (CRAF), the only Belgian Society devoted to underwater archaeology in Southern Belgium Since 1991 – Every three years, Marc Jasinski runs a theoretical course and practical training sessions for archaeologists and recreational divers willing to improve their skills at underwater excavation and recording methods Tutor for the Nautical Archaeological Society (UK) Since 1997 – Adviser to the Directorate of Archaeology of the Ministry of Southern Belgium, for underwater archaeology matters Member of the board and treasurer for the Fédération des Archéologues de Wallonie (Southern Belgium) Bibliography • JASINSKI M. & STENUIT R., 1962. Merveilleux Monde Souterrain. Hachette, Paris. • JASINSKI M., 1965. Plongées sous la Terre. Flammarion, Paris. 249 pp. • JASINSKI M., 1967. La Spéléologie. Arts & Voyages, Bruxelles.JASINSKI M.J., 1971 a. L’usage des objectifs très grands angulaires en photographie sous-marine. C.E.P., Bruxelles. pp. 5-25. • JASINSKI M.J., 1971 b. The underwater archaeological finds at Han-sur-Lesse. IJNA, 1:188-189 • JASINSKI M., 1976. Les secrets de la plongée sous-marine. Elsevier Sequoia, Paris – Bruxelles • JASINSKI M.J., 1986. Méthode topographique applicable aux travaux archéologiques subaquatiques. Bulletin de la Société Préhistorique Française, 83.5:141-144 • JASINSKI M.J., 1988. Notes concernant une méthode topographique applicable aux travaux archéologiques en milieu subaquatique et en cavernes. Archéo-log, 3:43-51 • JASINSKI M.J. et SERVAIS A. 1994. Application de la multilatération et des ajustements par la méthode des moindres carrés à la topographie archéologique sur le site de la Lesse souterraine à Han-sur-Lesse. Actes de la Deuxième journée d’archéologie namuroise, pp. 123-128. Namur, Ministère de la Région wallonne, DGATL, Service des Fouilles. • JASINSKI M.J., 1996. Le pont romain d’Amay. Bulletin d’information n°60, Cercle archéologique Hesbaye-Condroz, Villers-le-Bouillet, Belgique • JASINSKI M.J., 1999. L’opération Meusasec. Bilan et perspectives. Actes de la 7ème Journée d’Archéologie namuroise. Namur, Ministère de la Région wallonne, DGATL, Service des Fouilles • JASINSKI M.J., 1999. Introduction aux méthodes de l’archéologie subaquatique. Bruxelles, CRAF • JASINSKI M.J., 2000. Le bac d’Hermeton-sur-Meuse, un bateau traditionnel du patrimoine wallon. Actes de la 8ème Journée d’Archéologie namuroise. Namur, Ministère de la Région wallonne, DGATL, Service des Fouilles • JASINSKI M.J., 2000. La barque traditionnelle de Han-sur-Lesse. Actes de la 8ème Journée d’Archéologie namuroise. Namur, Ministère de la Région wallonne, DGATL, Service des Fouilles • JASINSKI M.J., 2000. Les battes et les passes artificielles en Haute Meuse namuroise. Actes de la 8ème Journée d’Archéologie namuroise. Namur, Ministère de la Région wallonne, DGATL, Service des Fouilles • JASINSKI M.J., 2000. L’archéologie subaquatique en Wallonie. Bilan et perspectives. In Bull. du Cercle d’Histoire et d’Archéologie Segnia, XXIV, 1999, pp. 168 –207. Houffalize, Belgium • JASINSKI M.J., 2000. Une belle tradition nautique : la barque traditionnelle de Han-sur-Lesse. in D. SARLET (ed.) Les Cahiers de l’Urbanisme, N° 31, pp 78-79. D.G.A.T.L.P., Ministère de la Région wallonne, Namur,

JOHN ADAMS

Jonathan Adams (Lecturer) is a specialist in maritime archaeology, with interests in ships as material culture, and in the practice of archaeology under water, particularly the ethics of the developing field of deepwater archaeology. He has participated in the excavation of several wreck sites, including the Mary Rose, the Amsterdam, and the Sea Venture. He is currently working on the Kravel and Krogen shipwreck research projects in Sweden and the Department’s field project at the 18th Century shipyard at Buckler’s Hard. He is course convenor for the MA/MSc in Maritime Archaeology and director of the Centre for Maritime Archaeology. Recent publications include: Adams, J., van Holk, A., & Maarleveld, T. J. Dredgers and Archaeology, Ship Finds from the Slufter. Ministerie WVC, The Netherlands, 1990. Rönnby, J. & Adams, J. Östersjöns Sjunkna Skepp – En marinarkeologisk tidsresa Tiden, Stockholm, 1994. Adams, J. & Rönnby, J. Furstens Fartyg. Swedish National Maritime Museum. Stockholm, 1996. Quinn, R., Adams, J. R., Dix, J. K., Bull, J. M. The Invincible (1758) site – an integrated geophysical assessment, International Journal of Nautical Archaeology, (in press). jjra@soton.ac.uk                  http://www.southampton.ac.uk/archaeology/cma/

DAVID MOORE

David Moore has been involved in maritime history and shipwreck research for over nineteen years, including stints as an underwater archaeologist for the states of North Carolina and Florida. He has conducted field research on over 100 shipwrecks dating from the 16th to 19th centuries. An alumnus of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington with a B.A. in Environmental Marine Science (May 1980), Moore traveled to Florida in 1983 as an archaeological consultant soon after completing course work for a Master’s degree in Maritime History and Nautical Archaeology at East Carolina University. His work in Florida included the structural investigation of the 17th century Spanish galleons Nuestra Senora de Atocha, Santa Margarita, and the San Martin. He directed the first deep-water shipwreck excavation utilizing robotic technology. As Principle Investigator on the Henrietta Marie Project, his efforts led to the completion of a Master’s thesis in 1989 on the historical and archaeological investigations of this significant slave ship site which was instrumental in the development of a major traveling exhibition currently touring the country. Born, raised, and educated in North Carolina, Moore returned to his home state in February 1996 when hired by the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort. He began researching the potential for locating Blackbeards shipwrecks in 1982 and is helping to direct the excavation of what is thought to be the pirates flagship Queen Annes Revenge. His research efforts into the historical background of North Carolinas most infamous pirate are also the focal point of a Ph.D. dissertation through Kings College London.

GARY MOMBER

On completion of the M.Sc. in Maritime Archaeology at Bangor University in 1990, Garry spent a couple of years at sea as a seismic navigator. This was followed by involvement in marine archaeological projects as a volunteer before becoming a tutor in the Nautical Archaeology Society (NAS) Training Programme in 1993. During 1994 Garry obtained professional diving qualifications and started work for the Hampshire & Wight Trust for Maritime Archaeology (HWTMA), employed on a contractual basis. Between 1994 and 1997 Garry worked as a NAS Training Officer, HWTMA field Officer and visiting lecturer at both Bristol and Southampton Universities. In 1997 he took the post of full time Archaeological Officer for the HWTMA where Garry was am responsible for the Trust fieldwork and practical training. Garry also plays an active role alongside the director presenting talks, and representing the Trust on local and national committees. PROJECTS • Solent Marine Archaeological Project (SOLMAP): Director • Survey of Alum Bay Wreck Site: Director • Coastal Change Climate and Instability: EC LIFE Project: Field Officer • Itchen River Project HWTMA survey of Intertidal archaeology along the Itchen River in conjunction with Southampton City Archaeology. • Investigation of an Ancient Fish Trap in Caernarfon Bay, N. Wales. • Topographical Surveys of Menai Straits. • Excavation of Rye Barge. Now in Hastings Shipwreck Heritage Centre. • Krogen Project, Supervisor; survey of the Severn wreck, Sweden. • Manager of Shore Base for SUBMAP: 91 divers surveyed the Resurgam. • Bucklers Hard Site Survey and Excavation: Field Officer / Assistant to Director • Langstone Harbour Survey and Excavation (submerged landscape): Supervisor • Wooton Quarr underwater Survey (submerged landscape): Officer / SupervisorNeedles Underwater Survey of Pomone: Officer / SupervisorCo-ordination of Welsh Projects as NAS Training Officer for Wales • Over 30 NAS Part I Courses • Over 20 NAS Part II Survey Fieldschools • Mulberry Harbour Project: Organiser / Co-ordinator • South Wales Marine Archaeological Project: Organiser / Co-ordinator, Survey of intertidal hulks in conjunction with Dyfed Archaeological Trust PUBLICATIONS / REPORTS • Gorad Beuno: Investigation of an Ancient Fish Trap in Caernarfon Bay, N. Wales. I.J.N.A. (1991) 20.2:95-109. • West Bay Archaeological Assessment: Research & Report • New Forest Shoreline Archaeological Assessment: Research & Report • Southampton Water EIA: Assessment & Report • Nash Bank EIA: Assessment & Report • Nab / Owers EIAs: 6 Desk based Assessments & Reports • West Solent Shoreline Management Plan: Archaeological assessment & Report • Larne Lough EIA: Desk based assessment & Report • Submarine Fibre Optic System in Celtic Sea EIA: Interpretation, Assessment & Report • NAS Newsletters and HWTMA Annual Reports. • Underwater Research and Discovery Conference; Lecturing and organisation. • Archaeological Column in Diver Magazine http://www.noc.soton.ac.uk/HWTMA/

Sir Tim Smit

The founder of the Eden Project has added another Cornish beauty spot to his portfolio after purchasing a picturesque port seen in several period dramas.

Sir Tim Smit has bought Charlestown, a 23-acre Georgian harbour near the town of St Austell. The village is loved by television and film directors, having been used as a backdrop in the BBC series PoldarkDr Who, the Tom Hardy series Taboo and Tim Burton’s Alice in Wonderland.

He talked about his plans for his recently acquired Shipwreck Centre at Charlestown          https://www.shipwreckcharlestown.co.uk/ 

ALEJANDRO MIRABAL JORGE

Marine Archaeologist, Operations Director, Diver, Executive Board Member (COO) in ARQUEONAUTAS WORLDWIDE (Portugal) my responsibilities are to organise, conduct and report on the survey and recovery operations with a large team of specialists, divers and auxiliary personnel in different countries. • Marine Archaeologist in close cooperation with Dr Margaret Rule, CBE, FSA. • Assisting Dr Margaret Rule in the scientific publication of the excavated wrecks of Cape Verde, by AWW (1995-2001). • Presently, License holder for archaeological survey and excavation in Mozambique and Indonesia.

COLIN MARTIN

Dr Colin Martin is a retired Reader in Maritime Archaeology at St Andrews University. He has directed excavations on three Spanish Armada shipwrecks in Scottish and Irish waters, two 17th century warships in the Sound of Mull, and a Dutch East Indiaman in the Outer Hebrides. He has also worked on land sites from the Roman to Early-Modern periods, and has specialised in aerial archaeology. He is currently investigating, with his wife Dr Paula Martin, maritime landscapes on Scotland’s western seaboard.  

DOM ROBINSON

TBA

AYSE DEVRIM ATAUZ

Ayse Devrim Atauz received her B.S. in Industrial Design in 1994 from the Middle East Technical University (Ankara, Turkey). Her interest in Archaeology led her to continue her education and research in this field, and she received her M.A in Archaeology and History of Art from Bilkent University (Ankara, Turkey) in 1997, having completed her thesis on the detailed investigation and research of an underwater site in Turkish waters. Specializing further on underwater archaeology, Ayse Atauz completed her PhD at Texas A&M University Nautical Archaeology Program in 2004. Fieldwork conducted by Dr. Atauz includes underwater archaeology projects in Turkey, Norway, Portugal, Malta, USA, Bulgaria, Italy and England. Her specialty is the development of ship construction between the fourteenth and the sixteenth centuries. http://www.promare.org/

RICHARD KEEN

Richard Keen was born in Guernsey and started commercial diving while still at school. He has spent his entire working life diving in Channel Island waters and has logged nearly 40,000 dives. He has always had a great interest in marine and land archaeology and has found many important wrecks. He has had the pleasure of working with Robert Stenuit and John Adams and Margaret Rule on local archaeological sites.

SAVAS KARAKAS

Savas Karakas is a true diving enthusiast and history lover. He was born in 1968 in Ankara/Turkey and holds a BA in Economics. Although he was a very popular TV personality hosting live morning shows and entertainment programs he preferred to keep track of his grandfather who fought at Gallipoli. In 1997 he started to research the Gallipoli shipwrecks. He has produced, host and contributed many programmes for the national and international televisions on Gallipoli. Gallipoli: History in the Depths, Gallipoli: War beneath the waves are just two from his many documentary productions. He is married and currently works for Iz TV; a respected Turkish documentary channel.

FIONA PUNTER

Fiona Punter had a lengthy career in media, working in sales and business development in magazines, commercial radio and television. Having cut her teeth at free-sheets and in womens magazines she became the first women to be employed in business development at Yorkshire & Tyne Tees Television and continued to hit her head against the glass ceiling at TVS, where she was the only person to be taken on board who didn’t have a degree! Radio beckoned and Fiona worked at Classic fM for several years where she learnt a lot about classical music and working very closely with a broadcasting team. She worked with a wide variety of clients ranging from Nestle to BMW, Beechams to Singapore Airlines. Latterly Fiona was a conference director in the Military and Security sectors, running events in Europe, the USA and Far East. Becoming tired of the jet-lag and 14 hour days she took early retirement.

PHIL SHORT

Gribshunden. King Hans of Denmark’s Flag ship from 1495. The survey and excavation of an Archeological time capsule from the perspective of the project DSO (Diving Safety Officer)” Phil has been diving professionally and exploring for over 26 years and has logged over 7000 dives in caves and open water using both open and closed circuit equipment, with over 3000 hours on Rebreather equipment. He started diving in 1990 from a background of dry caving and at first only completed diver training to pass short flooded sections of dry caves Phil Short. HSE Surface Supplied Commercial Diver. Scientific Diving project DSO (Diving Safety Officer). Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society (FRGS) and Fellow of the Explorers Club.

ANDY SEDDON

Andy Seddon led a group to explore a roman wreck site in the warm clear waters off Croatia. A REDS team was formed to dive and survey in detail a well-dived wreck of the Elk out of Plymouth to try archaeological survey techniques and see if there are any secrets left about the wreck to be discovered.

STEVE CLARKSON

Steve is a retired Programme Management Consultant. Most of his career was spent as an Electronic Systems Design Engineer working on Military, Nuclear and Medical instrumentation. His hobby has been diving from the age of 18 when he arrived in the UK from Northern Rhodesia in 1965. For 35 years he dived on over 500 shipwrecks around the UK as well as Ireland, California, Australia, Red Sea, Arabian Gulf and South Africa. Since retiring from the IT Consultancy Industry, he has followed his hobby of Marine Archaeology, investigating the shoreline shipwrecks of South Devon. His interest in archaeology started in the early 90’s after doing an NAS course and diving the “Swan” in the Sound of Mull. His recent projects include: HMS Venerable 1804, The Dartmouth Cannon Site 1577, Tea Clipper Gossamer 1868, and the Dragon 1757. He has been a member of Reading BSAC since 1966 and has been awarded the BSAC Jubilee Trust Duke of Edinburgh (Highly Recommended) Prize in 2010, 2011, 2012 & Gold in 2013 and Highly recommended in 2014 with his Start Point project..

MARTIN DAVIS

Martin is a BSAC Advanced Diver, and has been diving since 1977, he is now a Commercial diver mainly working on archaeological projects and has been Diving Officer for Southsea Sub-Aqua Club for the last 10 years. Now running his own Photographic business, In Depth Photography for the last 5 years and specialises in underwater photography and his work has won numerous awards over the years. Martin specialises in British wreck photography and also enjoys wreck history and archaeology. He is licensee for the historic protected wreck HM Submarine A1. Like many people the lure of the sea and the mystery of what lies beneath the waves has always been a fascination. It seemed a natural progression to take pictures to show others what was below, and this has now extended to creating 3D models using photogrammetry. For the last 4 years at Southsea Sub-Aqua club the focus of the club has been diving in Normandy, France. Martin has led 3 projects and multiple expeditions with some members of the club spending over a month in France with a combination of project diving, recreational diving and documentary film making.

THE LATE ROBERT F. MARX (1936-2019)

Robert F. Marx is an experienced diver who has written more than 40 books covering his wide range of interests in the field of marine archaeology and has published hundreds of scientific and popular articles and reports. Mr. Marx has been involved in over 80 underwater archaeology projects in all parts of the world. A historian by instinct and an adventurer at heart, Mr. Marx sailed from Spain to San Salvador in Nina II, a replica of one of Columbus’ tiny ships, discovered Mayan temples in the jungles of Central America and sunken treasures in all parts of the world. Mr. Marx has lectured professionally for more than forty-five years throughout the United States and in forty-two foreign countries on the subjects of underwater archaeology, maritime history, treasure hunting and travel.

CONNIE KELLER

Dr Connie Kelleher holds an MA in maritime archaeology from University College Cork (UCC) and a PhD on historical archaeology from Trinity College Dublin, the latter which focused on the history and archaeology of piracy in Irish waters. Connie’s full time work is with the Underwater Archaeology Unit (UAU) in the National Monuments Service, Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. She is visiting lecturer in the Archaeology Department of University College Cork, and delivers the ‘Introduction to Underwater Cultural Heritage’ course. Connie is a HSE Part III and I commercially trained diver and has worked in underwater archaeology since the late 1990s. She has carried out numerous underwater surveys and excavations on shipwreck sites around Ireland. Connie has published journal papers, chapters in books and co-authored the recently pubished book The RMS Lusitania: The Story of a Wreck and her book The Alliance of Pirates: Ireland and Atlantic Piracy is scheduled for publication in April 2020. She is currently secretary of the Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group (IPMAG), served for four years as board member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland (RSAI) and for eight years on the board of the Advisory Council on Underwater Archaeology (ACUA).

SALLY CARTWRIGHT

I was dragged off to try diving in 1993 after winding down from climbing trip to the Canadian Rockies. Totally hooked I progressed to rebreathers and deep wreck diving very quickly. To date I have been involved in many projects including Bluebird and Donald Campbell’s recovery, escort diver to the world record depth attempt for a rebreather blind person to leading expeditions to far reaches of the UK. Most will remember me for being Chairman of the Sub-aqua Association and working with other training agencies, CMAS and SITA.

JOANNA THOMSON

As the daughter and grand daughter of Royal Navy Commanders I defied family tradition by marrying into the Army, although my mother said I must always remember which is the Senior Service! As both a child and an adult I have spent much time overseas and am happiest when out on the water in my sailing dinghy (even if not always the right way up!). For the past 24 years we have lived on the beach at Walmer directly opposite the Goodwin Sands and the proposed dredging zone. I would love to have lived here when The Downs was crammed full of shipping, either preparing to set off on perilous voyages across the world or sheltering from savage storms. I have had what is now euphemistically described as a ‘portfolio career’; finding jobs in whichever part of the world I found myself. I have no qualifications whatsoever to be involved in this campaign except for the passionate belief that what Dover Harbour Board wants to do is fundamentally wrong on many levels. I am also deeply concerned at the lack of robustness by the Government’s statutory advisors to stick up for and protect our marine environment. The Goodwin Sands are an important and integral part of our nation’s history. They still provide a safe anchorage and create a vital sea defence for our chronically eroding foreshore. They deserve more of a future than becoming a quarry; a real and serious threat I am willing to devote my time and energy to prevent.

PAT CLYNE

As chief videographer for Mel Fisher’s expeditions, Pat Clyne has been involved with the Atocha and Margarita recovery projects for over 25 years. A native of New York, Clyne began studying photography in 1966 while involved with aerial photo mapping and reconnaissance missions in the Foreign Technology Division of the U.S. Air Force. After attending the Coastal Diving Academy in New York, he teamed up with world famous Treasure Hunter Mel Fisher while on a shark hunting expedition to Key West. He eventually became the captain of one of Fisher’s largest salvage vessels. During the search for the lower hull section of the Atocha, he played a major role in recording archeological data and mapping the artifact scatter pattern. As a licensed pilot, Clyne compiled aerial photo mosaics in the search for the main section of the Atocha which were scattered over many miles.In 1980 he opened the Treasure Salvors Photo Lab and developed a portable underwater photo grid track for assembling a photo mosaic of the Margarita hull structure. This mosaic was featured in National Geographic magazine. Clyne’s photographs of the search and recovery of the 1622 Spanish Galleons have appeared in many major magazines in the U.S. and abroad. In 1982, Clyne opened Paradigm Video Productions, which he still operates today. His video footage has been seen on many documentaries on T.V. including two National Geographic specials, an A & E documentary, The Learning Channel and the History Channel. Pat Clyne is listed in “The Who’s Who of Scuba Diving” compiled by the Academy of Marine Sciences & Underwater Research. Clyne currently resides in Key West Florida where he is the Vice President and Public Relations Director for Salvors Inc., and Media Consultant for Mel Fisher Enterprises. He travels extensively displaying these magnificent Treasures, while telling the story of Mel Fisher’s fabulous 16 year adventure. a http://www.uhexplorations.com/

LEO BALAI

Leonard (Leo) Balai (Paramaribo / Suriname 1946) studied law and public administration at the University of Amsterdam. After his graduation he was active in various fields. He was a member of the City Council of Amsterdam for almost 11 years. He took his PhD with a thesis on the slave ship Leusden and the West India Company. In May 2013 he published: Geschiedenis van de Amsterdamse Slavenhandel (History of the Amsterdam slave trade). He also published: The last journey of the slave ship Rusthof. Leo Balai is married to Dita Vermeulen; 5 grandchildren; lives in Amsterdam.